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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Tonino Guerra Talks Tarkovsky On The Late Filmmaker’s 80th

From filmmaker PJ Letofsky‘s work-in-progress, Tarkovsky: His God, His Devil: “On November 10, 2009 I had the privilege of interviewing Tonino Guerra in Pennabilli, Italy, for my new documentary. At the time he was already 90 years old, but sharp, remembering his friendship with the revered Russian auteur and their collaboration on Nostalghia. As this is one of the last interviews Tonino gave, I wanted to post it for his fans, honoring this great cinema poet by sharing his vitality and zest for life. The documentary, based on Tarkovsky’s diary, is slated for release in 2013.”

One Response to “Tonino Guerra Talks Tarkovsky On The Late Filmmaker’s 80th”

  1. eve shebang says:

    Thanks so much for sharing this.
    I was in touch in Mr. Guerra in the same years for a project. I had planned to visit him in Pennabili, but it didn’t happen.

    Eve

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