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By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

STRAUS UNVEILS BGP AS NEW YORK-BASED DOMESTIC SALES COMPANY

For Immediate Release

New York, NY (April 2, 2012) — Former New Line executive and producer Bill Straus has launched BGP, a Gotham-based domestic sales company.  Straus, who has had a producing deal with Circle of Confusion since 2003, will continue to work in affiliation with the well-regarded production-management company.  Straus’s producing banner, Billy Goat Pictures, will remain as a separate entity.

Among BGP’s initial clients will be THE PLAYROOM, a film by Julia Dyer (“Late Bloomers”) starring indie sensations John Hawkes (“Martha Marcy May Marlene”) and Molly Parker (DexterThe Firm).  Set in 1970’s suburbia, the film concerns a teenager and her younger siblings as they spend the night in their attic telling each other fantastical stories, while downstairs their parents entertain guests over the course of a gin-soaked evening.

THE PLAYROOM will premiere in the gala spotlight section of next month’s Tribeca Film Festival.  Hawkes has also garnered a lot of attention lately for a series of performances that include his Academy Award™ nominated role in WINTER’S BONE, the soon-to-be released Sundance hit THE SURROGATE, and a recurring role on HBO’s Eastbound and Down.

Straus’s producing credits include THE LAST RITES OF JOE MAY, WEAPONS, and the upcoming STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON at New Line/Warner Brothers.

“BGP is a boutique sales company focused on quality over quantity,” said Straus. “Because of our size, there will be a premium on client attentiveness and long term strategies when necessary.”

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One Response to “STRAUS UNVEILS BGP AS NEW YORK-BASED DOMESTIC SALES COMPANY”

  1. Filmnerd says:

    Awesome! Good luck to Bill, a stand-up guy with a heart of gold.

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