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By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

STRAUS UNVEILS BGP AS NEW YORK-BASED DOMESTIC SALES COMPANY

For Immediate Release

New York, NY (April 2, 2012) — Former New Line executive and producer Bill Straus has launched BGP, a Gotham-based domestic sales company.  Straus, who has had a producing deal with Circle of Confusion since 2003, will continue to work in affiliation with the well-regarded production-management company.  Straus’s producing banner, Billy Goat Pictures, will remain as a separate entity.

Among BGP’s initial clients will be THE PLAYROOM, a film by Julia Dyer (“Late Bloomers”) starring indie sensations John Hawkes (“Martha Marcy May Marlene”) and Molly Parker (DexterThe Firm).  Set in 1970’s suburbia, the film concerns a teenager and her younger siblings as they spend the night in their attic telling each other fantastical stories, while downstairs their parents entertain guests over the course of a gin-soaked evening.

THE PLAYROOM will premiere in the gala spotlight section of next month’s Tribeca Film Festival.  Hawkes has also garnered a lot of attention lately for a series of performances that include his Academy Award™ nominated role in WINTER’S BONE, the soon-to-be released Sundance hit THE SURROGATE, and a recurring role on HBO’s Eastbound and Down.

Straus’s producing credits include THE LAST RITES OF JOE MAY, WEAPONS, and the upcoming STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON at New Line/Warner Brothers.

“BGP is a boutique sales company focused on quality over quantity,” said Straus. “Because of our size, there will be a premium on client attentiveness and long term strategies when necessary.”

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One Response to “STRAUS UNVEILS BGP AS NEW YORK-BASED DOMESTIC SALES COMPANY”

  1. Filmnerd says:

    Awesome! Good luck to Bill, a stand-up guy with a heart of gold.

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INTERVIEWER
Do you outline plays before you start to write them?

PINTER
Not at all. I don’t know what kind of characters my plays will have until they…well, until they are. Until they indicate to me what they are. I don’t conceptualize in any way. Once I’ve got the clues I follow them—that’s my job, really, to follow the clues.

INTERVIEWER
What do you mean by clues? Can you remember how one of your plays developed in your mind—or was it a line-by-line progression?

PINTER
Of course I can’t remember exactly how a given play developed in my mind. I think what happens is that I write in a very high state of excitement and frustration. I follow what I see on the paper in front of me—one sentence after another. That doesn’t mean I don’t have a dim, possible overall idea—the image that starts off doesn’t just engender what happens immediately, it engenders the possibility of an overall happening, which carries me through. I’ve got an idea of what might happen—sometimes I’m absolutely right, but on many occasions I’ve been proved wrong by what does actually happen. Sometimes I’m going along and I find myself writing “C. comes in” when I didn’t know that he was going to come in; he had to come in at that point, that’s all.
~ Harold Pinter

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