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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Sofia Vergara Kills On SNL, Outshining The Writing

There was some clever stuff on SNL this week, but the shocker was how great Sofia Vergara was by sheer force of personality. She wasn’t camera-hogging… she just turned on that extra gear when things were heading into trouble, much the way a good cast member on the show does.

The highlight for me was her Fran Drescher, which was fascinating because it played so successfully on Vergara’s own aural signature. (And I don’t remember Kristin Wiig doing a lot of celebrity imitations, but this one is perfect.) I included two other mediocre sketches in which I felt like Vergara raised the bar unexpectedly.

8 Responses to “Sofia Vergara Kills On SNL, Outshining The Writing”

  1. She has a history of being better than what’s on the page. I first notieced her as what could have been a stereotypical ‘sassy Latino best friend’ in Tyler Perry’s MEET THE BROWNS. (Angela Bassett and Lance Gross are pretty good in it too). She brought a genuine wamrth and protective empathy that made her stand out in what should have been a stock part. She really excels at appearing to be someone who actually stand up for you/have your back in a pinch without judgment. I can’t put my finger on it, but it’s what makes her more than a sex symbol.

  2. Daniella Isaacs says:

    She was also one of the few guests on the show who wasn’t obviously reading from cue cards most of the time. Even some of the regulars were clearly looking at cue cards last night–and you can’t really blame them since they change stuff up until the end–but Vergara, for the most part, looked right at her costars in the scenes, as if she’d memorized everything, even whatever last minute changes they must have added. Wow.

  3. mysteryperfecta says:

    “And I don’t remember Kristin Wiig doing a lot of celebrity imitations, but this one is perfect.”

    She looks nothing like Drew (as opposed to the other cast as their characters) but when Wiig opened her mouth… “perfect” is right.

  4. J says:

    The last time they did “Bein’ Quirky,” Wiig did her amazing Bjork. (And Deschanel, who was hosting, played one of the Olsen Twins.)

  5. Rob says:

    Wiig’s Bjork is amazing, as are her Kathie Lee Gifford, Suze Orman, Michele Bachmann, and Paula Deen.

  6. Ace says:

    funny how people forget how long she has been around. She was one of the good parts of Big Trouble in 2002

  7. Peggy Sue says:

    It was one of the best I’ve seen in a long time!

  8. Don R. Lewis says:

    I finally watched the ep last night and thought she and the episode were great. I’ve never been able to get into MODREN FAMILY but found Vergara extremely funny. That being said…

    Isn’t she just Charro 2000?

    She was totally reading cue cards. She made a mistake in the Gilly skit and waited for the card to flip back so she could try the line again.

    Also…WTF is “One Direction?” That seemed like an 80’s boy band skit.

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