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MCN Columnists
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Picturing Ebertfest 2012

The Virginia Theater marquee.

Ebertfest poster, Virginia Theater.

Line for PHUNNY BUSINESS.

Opening night, The President's House.

David Bordwell and a programmer.

The spirit of Bill Murray, downtown.

Skies of the greater mid-South.

3 Responses to “Picturing Ebertfest 2012”

  1. Keil Shults says:

    fascinating AND informative

  2. Ray Pride says:

    I hope you are being kind, Keil!

  3. Keil Shults says:

    Sorry, I’ve been congested all week and in a foul mood. I’m also about 5 weeks away from being the only teacher at my middle school to achieve perfect attendance for the year. A grand feat, but it’s not helping my attitude or sanity.

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Pride

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“You can’t make films about something the audience knows nothing about. The trick is getting the audience to tell their own stories in the story so that they know what will happen. And then, just before they get bored, you must surprise them and move the story in a new direction.”
~ Mogens Rukov

“In some parts of the world, for instance among intellectuals in Italy, you do still feel the need to defend entertainment – where there is still a commitment to a certain traditional left realist project, or the ideas of Brecht or Godard and so on. But in Great Britain and North America and many parts of Europe, no, I don’t think there is a need. The question is: is there such a thing as entertainment anymore? That’s what I am not sure about. Entertainment is very much posited upon an idea of escape. When I started thinking about entertainment people would say things like ‘It takes you out of yourself’, or ‘It takes your mind off things’. And of course people still have problems, but there was very much the sense then that most of life was hard but you had entertainment to take you away from it for a bit. While now, because of all sorts of changes, you can listen to music anywhere you go all the time – and even choose the music, not just accept the music that is there. That sense of a gap between a bad life and something to escape into has disappeared or is greatly diminished. I don’t know whether that is a good or a bad thing but it changes the nature of entertainment. In that sense I would no longer know what I would then be defending. That despising of the popular, that despising of what is enjoyable, may still be there, but it is not a discourse that has so much weight anymore.”
~ Critic-Academic Richard Dyer On “Entertainment”

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