MCN Columnists
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Picturing Ebertfest 2012

The Virginia Theater marquee.

Ebertfest poster, Virginia Theater.

Line for PHUNNY BUSINESS.

Opening night, The President's House.

David Bordwell and a programmer.

The spirit of Bill Murray, downtown.

Skies of the greater mid-South.

3 Responses to “Picturing Ebertfest 2012”

  1. Keil Shults says:

    fascinating AND informative

  2. Ray Pride says:

    I hope you are being kind, Keil!

  3. Keil Shults says:

    Sorry, I’ve been congested all week and in a foul mood. I’m also about 5 weeks away from being the only teacher at my middle school to achieve perfect attendance for the year. A grand feat, but it’s not helping my attitude or sanity.

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick