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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Okay, Who Let the Filmmakers Have a Rifle?

Well, this one creates an interesting ethical dilemma for Tribeca Film Festival attendees who are also animal lovers/vegans/card-carrying members of PETA. Apparently two deer were illegally shot (and skinned and cooked, although that bit probably wasn’t illegal once the deer were already dead) in the filming of Tribeca Film Fest entry First Winter, about a group of Brooklyn new-age hippies/hipsters stranded in a remote farmhouse in the dead of winter with the food supply running out. And by “shot” I don’t mean “filmed,” or even “inadvertently shot by some PA screwing around with a loaded rifle.” I mean “shot” as in, the script called for a real live deer to be really shot and killed and skinned and roasted. For authenticity, I guess.

I know what my veggie and vegan friends would have to say about that … what do you say? Killing a wild animal just so you can record the killing (and skinning and roasting) for your film: Okay? Not cool, but not necessarily morally wrong? Or just flat-out ewwww?

2 Responses to “Okay, Who Let the Filmmakers Have a Rifle?”

  1. Leon says:

    If they actually ate it, then no more morally wrong than any other instance of going hunting, killing an animal, and eating it.

  2. DP says:

    yeah except the whole potching thing, and they only “ate” one.

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“It was always a crisis, but we had a great time,” James Schamus said, grinning. “Now I know how much fun directing is. I didn’t know. No one told me.”

“Athina Rachel Tsangari looks at men as if they are creatures from one of the wildlife documentaries she referred to in her poignant debut Attenberg. She is part of a undeclared new school of cinema, which might be called ‘The Behaviouralists’. So far there is only one other member of this school, Yorgos Lanthimos, whom she has previously collaborated with. He recently made The Lobster which sees Colin Farrell play a man who chooses a lobster as the animal he must turn into if he loses a bizarre relationship game in a hotel-cum-sanitorium. Games, systems and rules are essential for the Behaviouralists yet always in flux.”
~ Bert Rebhandl in Frieze

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