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By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

MILL CREEK ENTERTAINMENT SIGNS HOME VIDEO DISTRIBUTION DEAL WITH SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT

Mill Creek Entertainment Licenses 250 SPHE Titles for U.S. and Canadian DVD and Blu-ray Distribution

MINNEAPOLIS, MN, April 23, 2012 – Mill Creek Entertainment, a leading home entertainment distribution company has just inked a home video distribution deal with Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (SPHE) covering US and Canadian territories.  Under the licensing agreement Mill Creek Entertainment will distribute 250 films from the legendary SPHE catalog via a wide variety of DVD and Blu-ray compilations and collections to Mill Creek’s extensive network of traditional and non-traditional retail partners.  Mill Creek will distribute classics such as Ship of Fools, Bonjour Tristesse, The Last Detail, Avalon, The Chase and Agnes of God and audience favorites such as Hollywood Homicide, Hostel, All the Pretty Horses, Saving Silverman, Hollow Man and Vertical Limit.

“This treasure trove of SPHE films represents a watershed enhancement of our growing filmed entertainment catalog,” said Ian Warfield, President and COO of Mill Creek.  “We are excited to work with the Sony Pictures Home Entertainment team to deliver this amazing line-up of star-filled titles for the enjoyment of an even broader audience of consumers.”

Many films included in this distribution deal will be made available in Blu-ray high definition format for the first time ever.  Multi-feature standard definition DVD collections are also part of the strategic release plan to bring this vast assortment of classic and contemporary films to market.  The first wave of releases can be expected Fall 2012 while the specific lineup of initial releases will be announced at a later date.

About Mill Creek Entertainment

Mill Creek Entertainment is one of the industry’s leading providers of value-priced DVD and Blu-ray features and compilations. The Minneapolis-based company licenses content from a broad range of major and independent studios to augment its library of owned content and original productions.  With an experienced senior management and sales team the company manufactures and distributes its growing product line to a network of over 30,000 retail and distribution locations.  Product categories include classic and contemporary films, episodic television, kids, animation, episodic documentaries, special interest and fitness. Mill Creek Entertainment can be found on the World Wide Web at http://millcreekent.com.

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MAMET
Well, that, to me, is always the trick of dramaturgy; theoretically, perfectly, what one wants to do is put the protagonist and the audience in exactly the same position. The main question in drama, the way I was taught, is always what does the protagonist want. That’s what drama is. It comes down to that. It’s not about theme, it’s not about ideas, it’s not about setting, but what the protagonist wants. What gives rise to the drama, what is the precipitating event, and how, at the end of the play, do we see that event culminated? Do we see the protagonist’s wishes fulfilled or absolutely frustrated? That’s the structure of drama. You break it down into three acts.

INTERVIEWER
Does this explain why your plays have so little exposition?

MAMET
Yes. People only speak to get something. If I say, Let me tell you a few things about myself, already your defenses go up; you go, Look, I wonder what he wants from me, because no one ever speaks except to obtain an objective. That’s the only reason anyone ever opens their mouth, onstage or offstage. They may use a language that seems revealing, but if so, it’s just coincidence, because what they’re trying to do is accomplish an objective… The question is where does the dramatist have to lead you? Answer: the place where he or she thinks the audience needs to be led. But what does the character think? Does the character need to convey that information? If the answer is no, then you’d better cut it out, because you aren’t putting the audience in the same position with the protagonist. You’re saying, in effect, Let’s stop the play. That’s what the narration is doing—stopping the play… It’s action, as Aristotle said. That’s all that it is—exactly what the person does. It’s not what they “think,” because we don’t know what they think. It’s not what they say. It’s what they do, what they’re physically trying to accomplish on the stage. Which is exactly the same way we understand a person’s character in life—not by what they say, but by what they do. Say someone came up to you and said, I’m glad to be your neighbor because I’m a very honest man. That’s my character. I’m honest, I like to do things, I’m forthright, I like to be clear about everything, I like to be concise. Well, you really don’t know anything about that guy’s character. Or the person is onstage, and the playwright has him or her make those same claims in several subtle or not-so-subtle ways, the audience will say, Oh yes, I understand their character now; now I understand that they are a character. But in fact you don’t understand anything. You just understand that they’re jabbering to try to convince you of something.
~ David Mamet

INTERVIEWER
Do you outline plays before you start to write them?

PINTER
Not at all. I don’t know what kind of characters my plays will have until they…well, until they are. Until they indicate to me what they are. I don’t conceptualize in any way. Once I’ve got the clues I follow them—that’s my job, really, to follow the clues.

INTERVIEWER
What do you mean by clues? Can you remember how one of your plays developed in your mind—or was it a line-by-line progression?

PINTER
Of course I can’t remember exactly how a given play developed in my mind. I think what happens is that I write in a very high state of excitement and frustration. I follow what I see on the paper in front of me—one sentence after another. That doesn’t mean I don’t have a dim, possible overall idea—the image that starts off doesn’t just engender what happens immediately, it engenders the possibility of an overall happening, which carries me through. I’ve got an idea of what might happen—sometimes I’m absolutely right, but on many occasions I’ve been proved wrong by what does actually happen. Sometimes I’m going along and I find myself writing “C. comes in” when I didn’t know that he was going to come in; he had to come in at that point, that’s all.
~ Harold Pinter

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