By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

MILL CREEK ENTERTAINMENT SIGNS HOME VIDEO DISTRIBUTION DEAL WITH SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT

Mill Creek Entertainment Licenses 250 SPHE Titles for U.S. and Canadian DVD and Blu-ray Distribution

MINNEAPOLIS, MN, April 23, 2012 – Mill Creek Entertainment, a leading home entertainment distribution company has just inked a home video distribution deal with Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (SPHE) covering US and Canadian territories.  Under the licensing agreement Mill Creek Entertainment will distribute 250 films from the legendary SPHE catalog via a wide variety of DVD and Blu-ray compilations and collections to Mill Creek’s extensive network of traditional and non-traditional retail partners.  Mill Creek will distribute classics such as Ship of Fools, Bonjour Tristesse, The Last Detail, Avalon, The Chase and Agnes of God and audience favorites such as Hollywood Homicide, Hostel, All the Pretty Horses, Saving Silverman, Hollow Man and Vertical Limit.

“This treasure trove of SPHE films represents a watershed enhancement of our growing filmed entertainment catalog,” said Ian Warfield, President and COO of Mill Creek.  “We are excited to work with the Sony Pictures Home Entertainment team to deliver this amazing line-up of star-filled titles for the enjoyment of an even broader audience of consumers.”

Many films included in this distribution deal will be made available in Blu-ray high definition format for the first time ever.  Multi-feature standard definition DVD collections are also part of the strategic release plan to bring this vast assortment of classic and contemporary films to market.  The first wave of releases can be expected Fall 2012 while the specific lineup of initial releases will be announced at a later date.

About Mill Creek Entertainment

Mill Creek Entertainment is one of the industry’s leading providers of value-priced DVD and Blu-ray features and compilations. The Minneapolis-based company licenses content from a broad range of major and independent studios to augment its library of owned content and original productions.  With an experienced senior management and sales team the company manufactures and distributes its growing product line to a network of over 30,000 retail and distribution locations.  Product categories include classic and contemporary films, episodic television, kids, animation, episodic documentaries, special interest and fitness. Mill Creek Entertainment can be found on the World Wide Web at http://millcreekent.com.

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~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
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