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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Lukas Moodysson Makes Nice With WE ARE THE BEST

Fucking Åmål meets Times Square? Ja! Rough translation from the Swedish: “A film about Bobo, Clara, and Hedwig. Three girls who are twelve or thirteen years. Who drag around on the streets and babbling. Who are brave and tough and strong and weak and confused and goofy. And are on their own way too early. Heat fish sticks in the toaster when the mother is at the pub. Start a punk rock band without instruments to play, even though everyone says that punk is dead.

If being different and of a friendship that is greater than everything else.

A movie with lots of music and a lot of humor and very serious. - I hope there will be a happy film, full of hope and vitality, says Lukas Moodysson.

Coco Moodysson has written comic book “Never bedtime,” which is the basis for the story. Lukas Moodysson has adapted. Shooting is planned for autumn 2012, with a fall 2013 release.” [Image source.]

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman