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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Lukas Moodysson Makes Nice With WE ARE THE BEST

Fucking Åmål meets Times Square? Ja! Rough translation from the Swedish: “A film about Bobo, Clara, and Hedwig. Three girls who are twelve or thirteen years. Who drag around on the streets and babbling. Who are brave and tough and strong and weak and confused and goofy. And are on their own way too early. Heat fish sticks in the toaster when the mother is at the pub. Start a punk rock band without instruments to play, even though everyone says that punk is dead.

If being different and of a friendship that is greater than everything else.

A movie with lots of music and a lot of humor and very serious. – I hope there will be a happy film, full of hope and vitality, says Lukas Moodysson.

Coco Moodysson has written comic book “Never bedtime,” which is the basis for the story. Lukas Moodysson has adapted. Shooting is planned for autumn 2012, with a fall 2013 release.” [Image source.]

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray