By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

JULIUS NASSO AND TODD MOYER FORM WAKEFIELD INTERNATIONAL PICTURES

For Immediate Release

New Production Company Announces First Film: SQUATTERS

New York/Los Angeles, April 12, 2012–Veteran film producers Julius R. Nasso and Todd Moyer have partnered in a new film financing and production entity, Wakefield International Pictures LLC.  With offices in both Los Angeles and New York, the company plans to package, finance and produce as many as four to six films per year.

Nasso (NARC: SING YOUR SONG: UNDER SIEGE 2; FIRE DOWN BELOW) and Moyer (WILLIAM TELL 3D;  BARB WIRE; GEORGE AND THE DRAGON; VIRUS) have known each other for close to two decades, since Moyer was president of production for Seagal-Nasso films.

First up for Wakefield will be SQUATTERS, directed by Martin Weisz.  Julius Nasso, Todd Moyer and Cordula Weisz are producing the picture, which begins shooting next month.  Starring Thomas Dekker (MY SISTER’S KEEPER, ANGELS CREST and HBO’s CINEMA VERITE) and Gabriella Wilde (THE THREE MUSTEKETEERS; ST. TRINIAN’S II; DARK HORSE) the film starts production in Los Angeles in early May.  Frankie Nasso and Jeff Kranzdorf  will serve as executive producers. The film tells the story of a young homeless couple in Venice Beach who move into a mansion in the Pacific Palisades while the owners are on vacation.  When the owners come home early, things get complicated.

Moyer recalls, “When I read Justin Shilton’s script—one of the most powerful and beautiful I’ve encountered in years—I felt we just had to make this film.  I’ve known director Martin Weisz for many years and we are proud to support him and these terrific lead actors in this endeavor.” Screenwriter Shilton is best known as an actor for his roles in LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE and THE AVIATOR, among others.

Nasso added, “We’re pleased to be involved with such incredible material, and was hugely impressed with the readings of our two young leads. I think with such an excellent script, Dekker and Wilde have the chance to really embrace these roles and break out on the highest levels.  We believe the film has very broad demographic appeal and expect everyone from 15-80 will like it equally!”

For his part, director Martin Weisz directed THE HILLS HAVE EYES II and has directed more than 350 music videos for artists such as Puff Daddy, Korn, Live, Sisquo, Nickelback and Fuel.  He’s repped by Anonymous Content and is owner of Weird Pictures.  Weisz and Moyer have another film, DREAMT, in development.

Wakefield will be announcing more films in their 2012 slate in coming weeks.

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