Z

By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

JULIUS NASSO AND TODD MOYER FORM WAKEFIELD INTERNATIONAL PICTURES

For Immediate Release

New Production Company Announces First Film: SQUATTERS

New York/Los Angeles, April 12, 2012–Veteran film producers Julius R. Nasso and Todd Moyer have partnered in a new film financing and production entity, Wakefield International Pictures LLC.  With offices in both Los Angeles and New York, the company plans to package, finance and produce as many as four to six films per year.

Nasso (NARC: SING YOUR SONG: UNDER SIEGE 2; FIRE DOWN BELOW) and Moyer (WILLIAM TELL 3D;  BARB WIRE; GEORGE AND THE DRAGON; VIRUS) have known each other for close to two decades, since Moyer was president of production for Seagal-Nasso films.

First up for Wakefield will be SQUATTERS, directed by Martin Weisz.  Julius Nasso, Todd Moyer and Cordula Weisz are producing the picture, which begins shooting next month.  Starring Thomas Dekker (MY SISTER’S KEEPER, ANGELS CREST and HBO’s CINEMA VERITE) and Gabriella Wilde (THE THREE MUSTEKETEERS; ST. TRINIAN’S II; DARK HORSE) the film starts production in Los Angeles in early May.  Frankie Nasso and Jeff Kranzdorf  will serve as executive producers. The film tells the story of a young homeless couple in Venice Beach who move into a mansion in the Pacific Palisades while the owners are on vacation.  When the owners come home early, things get complicated.

Moyer recalls, “When I read Justin Shilton’s script—one of the most powerful and beautiful I’ve encountered in years—I felt we just had to make this film.  I’ve known director Martin Weisz for many years and we are proud to support him and these terrific lead actors in this endeavor.” Screenwriter Shilton is best known as an actor for his roles in LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE and THE AVIATOR, among others.

Nasso added, “We’re pleased to be involved with such incredible material, and was hugely impressed with the readings of our two young leads. I think with such an excellent script, Dekker and Wilde have the chance to really embrace these roles and break out on the highest levels.  We believe the film has very broad demographic appeal and expect everyone from 15-80 will like it equally!”

For his part, director Martin Weisz directed THE HILLS HAVE EYES II and has directed more than 350 music videos for artists such as Puff Daddy, Korn, Live, Sisquo, Nickelback and Fuel.  He’s repped by Anonymous Content and is owner of Weird Pictures.  Weisz and Moyer have another film, DREAMT, in development.

Wakefield will be announcing more films in their 2012 slate in coming weeks.

#     #     #

Leave a Reply

Z

Quote Unquotesee all »

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

“The evening’s curious vanity and irrelevance stay with me, if only because those qualities characterize so many of Hollywood’s best intentions. Social problems present themselves to many of these people in terms of a scenario, in which, once certain key scenes are licked (the confrontation on the courthouse steps, the revelation that the opposition leader has an anti-Semitic past, the presentation of the bill of participants to the President, a Henry Fonda cameo), the plot will proceed inexorably to an upbeat fade. Marlon Brando does not, in a well-plotted motion picture, picket San Quentin in vain: what we are talking about here is faith in a dramatic convention. Things “happen” in motion pictures. There is always a resolution, always a strong cause-effect dramatic line, and to perceive the world in those terms is to assume an ending for every social scenario… If the poor people march on Washington and camp out, there to receive bundles of clothes gathered on the Fox lot by Barbra Streisand, then some good must come of it (the script here has a great many dramatic staples, not the least of them in a sentimental notion of Washington as an open forum, cf. Mr. Deeds Goes to Washington), and doubts have no place in the story.”
~ Joan Didion On Hw’d In 1970

Z Z