By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

JULIUS NASSO AND TODD MOYER FORM WAKEFIELD INTERNATIONAL PICTURES

For Immediate Release

New Production Company Announces First Film: SQUATTERS

New York/Los Angeles, April 12, 2012–Veteran film producers Julius R. Nasso and Todd Moyer have partnered in a new film financing and production entity, Wakefield International Pictures LLC.  With offices in both Los Angeles and New York, the company plans to package, finance and produce as many as four to six films per year.

Nasso (NARC: SING YOUR SONG: UNDER SIEGE 2; FIRE DOWN BELOW) and Moyer (WILLIAM TELL 3D;  BARB WIRE; GEORGE AND THE DRAGON; VIRUS) have known each other for close to two decades, since Moyer was president of production for Seagal-Nasso films.

First up for Wakefield will be SQUATTERS, directed by Martin Weisz.  Julius Nasso, Todd Moyer and Cordula Weisz are producing the picture, which begins shooting next month.  Starring Thomas Dekker (MY SISTER’S KEEPER, ANGELS CREST and HBO’s CINEMA VERITE) and Gabriella Wilde (THE THREE MUSTEKETEERS; ST. TRINIAN’S II; DARK HORSE) the film starts production in Los Angeles in early May.  Frankie Nasso and Jeff Kranzdorf  will serve as executive producers. The film tells the story of a young homeless couple in Venice Beach who move into a mansion in the Pacific Palisades while the owners are on vacation.  When the owners come home early, things get complicated.

Moyer recalls, “When I read Justin Shilton’s script—one of the most powerful and beautiful I’ve encountered in years—I felt we just had to make this film.  I’ve known director Martin Weisz for many years and we are proud to support him and these terrific lead actors in this endeavor.” Screenwriter Shilton is best known as an actor for his roles in LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE and THE AVIATOR, among others.

Nasso added, “We’re pleased to be involved with such incredible material, and was hugely impressed with the readings of our two young leads. I think with such an excellent script, Dekker and Wilde have the chance to really embrace these roles and break out on the highest levels.  We believe the film has very broad demographic appeal and expect everyone from 15-80 will like it equally!”

For his part, director Martin Weisz directed THE HILLS HAVE EYES II and has directed more than 350 music videos for artists such as Puff Daddy, Korn, Live, Sisquo, Nickelback and Fuel.  He’s repped by Anonymous Content and is owner of Weird Pictures.  Weisz and Moyer have another film, DREAMT, in development.

Wakefield will be announcing more films in their 2012 slate in coming weeks.

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MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2