MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30: Damsels in Distress, writer/director Whit Stillman

8 Responses to “DP/30: Damsels in Distress, writer/director Whit Stillman”

  1. sanj says:

    this seemed like a dp/60 … haven’t seen any of his films

    dude needs to make some action films or something if he wants to get noticed

  2. JKill says:

    DAMSELS IN DISTRESS is great. I saw it some weeks back at an early screening as part of a Stillman retrospective. It’s probably his silliest, most broad and stylized film, which is part of its many charms. Gerwig is terrific in it. It’s a really fun and original film. I basically smiled the whole way through.

  3. The Pope says:

    Sanj, are you using an irony so deeply embedded I am completely unaware of it?

  4. sanj says:

    nah – he’s only made like 4-5 movies .. still haven’t seen them.

    so give him a comic book movie then people will figure out who he is

  5. The Pope says:

    “so give him a comic book movie then people will figure out who he is”

    So, Steven Spielberg has only just come on your radar? In which case, you might want to check out these directors: James Cameron, Martin Scorsese, David Fincher, Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood, Katheryn Bigelow, David Lynch, the Coen Brothers, Terence Mallick, Steven Soderbergh and Alexander Payne.

  6. Yancy Skancy says:

    I dig Stillman a lot, but in fairness to sanj (who I assume is a fairly young guy), this is his first film in 14 years, and his previous work hasn’t been canonized like that of, say, the similarly non-prolific Malick.

  7. The Pope says:

    Yancy Skancy,
    That’s fair enough. Although I’ve heard of these things called DVDs and they’re great because they allow me to watch films I missed in theaters.

  8. Brian Street says:

    Ha! Here he dances the Sambola lol

    http://vimeo.com/39214972

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2