MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Chicago

Heading to Ebertfest tomorrow. In the meanwhile, trying not to worry too much about Netflix or CBS Films. Klady won’t be at CinemaCon. Dretzka will.

Here is a look at NATO’s newest numbers…

20120424-120205.jpg
20120424-120412.jpg
20120424-120256.jpg
20120424-120345.jpg
20120424-120353.jpg
20120424-120405.jpg

6 Responses to “Chicago”

  1. Krillian says:

    Ladies and gentlemen of the jury,….. a tapdance!

  2. anghus says:

    So The Hobbit footage was met with indifference.

    And Bane is now understandable.

    bad first step for The Hobbit. Who wants to bet they pull 24 fps out of it before release?

  3. waterbucket says:

    I was so excited for The Hobbit but then I recently read the book and it was bad. There’s no sense of urgency in the book at all. Unlike Lord of the Rings where I had to stay up to read and book and see if Frodo would be ok. I couldn’t care less if Smaug is defeated or if Bilbo makes it back home (which we already know he did).

  4. Krillian says:

    Dave’s gotta be happy with the theatrical window not shrinking. Is part of that becuz studios won’t give title to Redbox or Netflix until a month or two after they give it to Blockbuster? How do they calculate that?

  5. Mariamu says:

    Waterbucket-It helps if you read The Hobbit first.

  6. hcat says:

    Krillian- the theatrical window would be until the disc goes on sale in stores. I don’t think the Netflix month back rule plays into the calculation.

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris

“As these stories continue to break, in the weeks since women have said they were harassed and abused by Harvey Weinstein, which was not the birth of a movement but an easy and highly visible shorthand for decades of organizing against sexual harassment that preceded this moment, I hope to gain back my time, my work. Lately, though, I have noticed a drift in the discourse from violated rights to violated feelings: the swelled number of reporters on the beat, the burden on each woman’s story to concern a man “important” enough to report on, the detailed accounting of hotel robes and incriminating texts along with a careful description of what was grabbed, who exposed what, and how many times. What I remember most, from “my story” is how small the sex talk felt, almost dull. I did not feel hurt. I had no pain to confess in public. As more stories come out, I like to think that we would also believe a woman who said, for example, that the sight of the penis of the man who promised her work did not wound her, and that the loss she felt was not some loss of herself but of her time, energy, power.”
~ “The Unsexy Truth About Harassment,” by Melissa Gira Grant