MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

BYOB

25 Responses to “BYOB”

  1. kbx says:

    the strange teasers of trailers trend continues with 15 seconds of Oliver Stone’s Savages trailer

    http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1682446/savages-trailer.jhtml

  2. movielocke says:

    http://www.google.com/movies

    So nowhere in west los angeles is playing Titanic flat? First I tried to find it in Imax (fake Imax at century city doesn’t count). Then I tried to find it flat, and didn’t bring up anywhere. The only place it might not be 3D is in the dome at Arclight, but I don’t really like the curved screen.

    I won’t risk 3D at Arclight again, the active shutter glasses they use turn every movie a jaundiced urine yellow (except for Transformers 3, which forced them to use a different system or supplied DCP for their 3D system that countered the urine color cast of the 3D glasses) Landmark’s 3D is consistently dull with low brightness. Pacific theatres are hit and miss, but I remember it as being painfully dark (darker than even Landmark). AMC is pretty much the same painfulness as Pacific.

    Since it isn’t playing flat anywhere, looks like we may have to miss seeing it. :(

    edit: ahh haha, so I can see it at Arclight Beach Cities at 9:45 AM saturday or sunday, or The Grove at 1:30 on Sunday?

  3. cadavra says:

    Be careful when you click on the home-page link to the DARK SHADOWS soundtrack. Some of the track titles are SPOILERS. DP, you should add a warning. :-(

  4. Paul D/Stella says:

    Just got back from seeing Bully. I’m not ashamed to say I cried more than once. It’s incredibly potent. I do think that because there are so many stories to tell, the filmmakers tried to incorporate too many into 95 or so minutes. Some aren’t given the attention they deserve and left me wanting more. But wow most of it is raw and heartbreaking. And also maddening because too many adults are still sticking their heads in the sand and acting as if exhibiting violent behavior is just a normal part of being a kid and nothing to be overly concerned about. Powerful stuff.

  5. Ray Pride says:

    Thanks for the heads up… yeeks.

  6. SamLowry says:

    Jeebus, sanj, couldn’t find a page with a more irritating animated gif right near everything, could you?

  7. arisp says:

    Lots of kids were bullied when I went to school. I’m very close with a few of them still. They’re fine. This “problem” is a 21st century “epidemic”.

  8. SamLowry says:

    I was told that when my grandfather was bullied in school, he gathered together all the other victims of this gang and they proceeded to beat the crap out of the bullies.

    Problem solved.

    (I, however, didn’t have such a handy support group and had to quietly take it.)

  9. JS Partisan says:

    Kids have been beating the shit out of one another forever and guess what arisp? IT’S ALWAYS HAS BEEN BULLSHIT. Going to school shouldn’t be freaking hellish experience, but assholic kids with shit parents, keep terrorizing good kids all across the country. Seriously, the parents of these little hellions should be held more and more accountable for their kids behaviour.

  10. Paul D/Stella says:

    One kid does point out that when he eventually strikes back against the bullies, they leave him alone.

    And that is really touching arisp. Is it possible that not every bullying experience is the same? When kids are literally strangling and beating a 12-year-old on a bus, every single day, should we just shrug it off as kids being kids? Do we want school administrators whose job is to ensure a safe school environment for all pupils to flat-out ignore kids who say that they are being physically and verbally harassed inside the school building? If your kid was being beaten on the bus, would you have no problem with as Assistant Principal telling you there’s nothing they can do because the last time they rode the school bus all the kids were well-behaved? Just because it’s a new “epidemic” does not mean it isn’t a real problem. Not everything was better in 1953.

  11. leahnz says:

    i’m guessing ‘arisp’ doesn’t have any kids

  12. Paul D/Stella says:

    That seems likely. It really hits home for those of us who do. Alex’s mother summarizes it extremely well, talking about how much faith you put into adults at school responsible for your child’s well-being, and what it feels like when they let you down.

  13. Martin S says:

    Haven’t seen Bully yet, but I’m hoping they acknowledge that it’s not the kids, it’s the system.

    The whole thing is devolving into a penitentiary system to freeze young adults from entering the job market for internships or little pay, which would knock off older, higher paid workers. What we’ve witnessed over the past decades is the domino effect of behaviors and attitudes dropping down the chain.

  14. Paul D/Stella says:

    I think Bully portrays the system and adults as far more responsible than the kids. It conveys that nothing will change if parents and school officials turn a blind eye to it or pretend it’s not a real problem. Countless times concerned parents say school officials tell them it’s just kids being kids or boys being boys.

  15. christian says:

    Yeah, kids get bullied. But now it’s codified by cruel prank and reality shows. And now these bullied kids have greater access to firepower than ever.

    Witness: Oakland.

  16. Smith says:

    The trailer for Savages is pretty great. Overheated Oliver Stone/Tony Scott-style mayhem.

  17. JKill says:

    I agree, Smith.

    That’s an awesome trailer. It’s now one of my most anticipated for the whole summer. I hope Stone knocks it out of the part. Looks great.

  18. SamLowry says:

    There’s apparently a scene in Bully where an assistant principal wraps up a sit-down with two boys who had been fighting by telling them to shake hands. One boy looks shocked and disgusted while the other is all smiles and more than happy to accept this solution.

    Guess which one is the bully.

  19. Paul D/Stella says:

    Bully Spoilers

    The boy who looks shocked and is reluctant to shake hands is indeed the victim. The other boy has been threatening to stab him and hitting him on the playground, among other things. So the Assistant Principal (who is a moron throughout) suggests he avoid the bully. The kid says he goes out of his way to avoid him, but the bully basically stalks him, follows him wherever he goes. Eventually the Assistant Principal allows the bully to walk away because he extended his hand (with a shit-eating grin on his face) and she proceeds to chastise the victim. She’s a real winner.

  20. cadavra says:

    Hardly a spoiler. In this increasingly hateful and violent nation, more often than not the victim is “at fault.” I’m sure you’ve heard of the Texas high school cheerleader who was ordered by the court to pay damages to the classmate who raped her. Indeed, there’s a bill pending in at least one Southern state that would literally change the term “rape victim” to “accuser.” We’ve created a society where bullying–and worse–is considered acceptable, even admirable, behavior.

  21. Foamy Squirrel says:

    “I’m sure you’ve heard of the Texas high school cheerleader who was ordered by the court to pay damages to the classmate who raped her.”

    Was that the one who was dropped from the team because she refused to cheer for the football player who raped her?

  22. tbunny says:

    “Lots of kids were bullied when I went to school. I’m very close with a few of them still. They’re fine. This “problem” is a 21st century “epidemic”.”

    You could say the same thing about child abuse. Or rape. Times change. Letting kids abuse one another is absolutely indefensible. So is a school system that isn’t safe for kids. It’s not complicated.

  23. christian says:

    Americans often secretly love bullies.

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2

“I wanted to make you love a murderer. There’s no way of redeeming him. He’s a drunk and a killer. He killed at least seven people (that we know of). But there were reasons he was a bad guy. He was surrounded by evil in those days. A lot of people were killed building modern Florida—modern everywhere. Watson had plenty of opportunities to see how rough those guys were playing and he thought he could do it too. At least he rationalized it that way. He had the devil beaten out of him and became a very dangerous guy. And he couldn’t handle his liquor, which is one of the worst aspects of him. And he went crazy. Understanding how that happened is useful, I think. There’s no reason any one of us couldn’t be Edgar Watson.”
~ Peter Mathiessen On Writing “Killing Mister Watson”