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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

April 9’s Eadweard J. Muybridge Animated Google Doodle

6 Responses to “April 9’s Eadweard J. Muybridge Animated Google Doodle”

  1. Harish Agarwal says:

    Great Day..9th April….

  2. Jeff says:

    Mint Julep please. Festive.

  3. Lisa S. says:

    This is great. THANK YOU FOR SHARING!

  4. Ann says:

    Very informative/educational! – (like most G Doodles!) – motivated me to find out about someone/something I’d never heard of!

  5. Danny says:

    the four horseman of the apocalypse is on the Google Picture today!
    look at the four colors of the horse on google
    blue green red and white horse on the picture. The yellow horse is you watching!
    When you look at the research on Eadweard Muybridge
    on Wikipedia there are FOUR pictures on wikipedia’s website
    bison=famine
    picture of people with swords=war
    2 people dancing=death: the article speaks of Eadweard dying of plague
    Person on galloping horse=Jesus Christ
    only a matter of time people!

  6. Angie says:

    I enjoyed it like all the other google “doodles”. I look forward to the next one. It did get me to google who Mr. Muybridge was. Congratulations on this and every other one. Thank you.

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“To make work out of your own imagination is an invitation to a lot of unforgiving hard slog, failure, satisfaction which doesn’t last long, more failure, discontent, maybe a prize, a bit more satisfaction, self doubt, dissatisfaction, lots more hard work and so on and so on. But anyone who’s persisted and written something and got to the end and even better had it published or performed learns quickly that the hard slog, the frustrations, the blind alleys and dead ends and scenes that don’t work and great ideas that turn to dust are in fact a big part of the work. The reward for the agony is not the ecstasy of Chuck Heston finishing the Sistine Chapel but still more agony that might also include some kind of not pleasure exactly, maybe a brief, terrible joy.”
~ Australian playwright Michael Gow

“People react primarily to direct experience and not to abstractions; it is very rare to find anyone who can become emotionally involved with an abstraction. The longer the bomb is around without anything happening, the better the job that people do in psychologically denying its existence. It has become as abstract as the fact that we are all going to die someday, which we usually do an excellent job of denying. For this reason, most people have very little interest in nuclear war. It has become even less interesting as a problem than, say, city government, and the longer a nuclear event is postponed, the greater becomes the illusion that we are constantly building up security, like interest at the bank. As time goes on, the danger increases, I believe, because the thing becomes more and more remote in people’s minds. No one can predict the panic that suddenly arises when all the lights go out — that indefinable something that can make a leader abandon his carefully laid plans. A lot of effort has gone into trying to imagine possible nuclear accidents and to protect against them. But whether the human imagination is really capable of encompassing all the subtle permutations and psychological variants of these possibilities, I doubt. The nuclear strategists who make up all those war scenarios are never as inventive as reality, and political and military leaders are never as sophisticated as they think they are.”
~ Stanley Kubrick

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