MCN Blogs
Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

A Kids’ Band Covering German Industrial Metal? Yes, Please.

Happy Saturday, folks! I’m on vacation in lovely Port Townsend with my pack of kids and some friends, but I came across this little bit of awesomeness this morning and knew you’d appreciate it as much as I did. This is Children Medieval Band – Stefan (10) on guitar, violin, harmonica and vocals, Olga (8) on keys, and Cornelia (5) rocking out the drums, performing a cover of Rammstein’s Sonne. Enjoy a little German industrial metal with your weekend brunch. More cuteness, less pyrotechnics than the original. 100% awesome.

One Response to “A Kids’ Band Covering German Industrial Metal? Yes, Please.”

  1. Peter says:

    Swing by The Writers’ Workshoppe while you are here!
    234 Taylor Street downtown. We’re a place for writers; workshops, tools, gifts . . . did I mention books?!

    http://www.writersworkshoppe.com

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman