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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

SXSW Pick: Amy Seimetz’s Sun Don’t Shine

I don’t run a lot of posters and clips here, for big studio films at least, but every now and again a pitch will catch my interest. In this case, it was an email about Amy Seimetz’s feature film directorial debut, Sun Don’t Shine, which is having its world premiere at SXSW. Seimetz, of course, starred in Megan Griffith’s The Off Hours, a well-received feature that debuted at Sundance in 2011. And I’m on kind of a mission to support and write about female filmmakers right now, in anticipation of both another Cannes and another awards season that will be dismally bereft of female directors, writers and producers. Also, it stars Kate Lyn Sheil, who was in both The Color Wheel and Green last year. These two, along with Sophia Takal (director of Green) are perched to be strong female voices on the indie film scene.

Clip to the film is after the jump.

The music in the scene is by Cary Ann Hearst, who is also performing at SXSW.

Writer/director/actor/producer Amy Seimetz returns to SXSW with her mesmerizing film Sun Don’t Shine, which follows a troubled young couple’s road trip along the desolate yet hauntingly beautiful landscape of central Florida. As the couple travels up the Gulf Coast the disturbing details of their excursion gradually begin to emerge, revealing Crystal’s (Kate Lyn Sheil) sinister past and the couple’s troubling future.

Director(s): Amy Seimetz
Executive Producer(s): Tim Fargo, Andrew Krucoff, Shane Carruth, Mark Reeb
Producer(s): Kim Sherman, Amy Seimetz
Screenwriter(s): Amy Seimetz
Cinematographer: Jay Keitel
Editor(s): David Lowery, Amy Seimetz
Production Designer: Lanie Faith Marie Overton
Sound Designer: Ben Huff
Additional Credits: Co-Producer: Dalila Droege, AC/gaffer: Michael Wilson, Sound Recordist: Andrew “C-Nug” Brown, Associate Producer: Andrew Hevia

Principal Cast: Kate Lyn Sheil, Kentucker Audley, AJ Bowen, Kit Gwinn, Mark Reeb

Sun Don’t Shine – Worldwide Premiere- SXSW 2012 – Saturday, March 10th, 2012- Alamo Lamar C

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“I don’t know, because I don’t know much about those cameras. I know that’s been a complaint, but I wouldn’t know. Film is what worked for this film. I have a fear of the unknown. I’ve spent a long time trying to learn one camera, and to fucking stop and try to learn another one… I would have to stop for 20 years! I’m a slow learner; I’d have to go through the manual, it would be starting over. So there’s that, too. It’s an issue for filmmakers, and it’s on people’s minds, and I have to say that it’s a lot more challenging and difficult just to kind of get somebody to show film or to print film. It’s far more challenging than it should be right now, and we’re just trying to keep it alive a little bit and create a little pocket where it can be shown that way in various places across the country right now.”
~ Paul Thomas Anderson To David Ehrlich On The Prospect Of Switching From Film

“Almodóvar–the first name is almost unnecessary–is a genius, is a flower, is a guiding light: the last, best son of Buñuel and so much more than that. His screenplays, which he directs with passion and fine care, have taught us about the exteriors of his native land and the interiors of our own hearts. From the early, manic experimental Super-8 work to the breakthrough Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, his titles are as evocative as most people’s screenplays. Yet for all their antic energy, Almodóvar’s films are deeply spiritual: watching his disturbing, mysterious, heart-rending Talk to Her is to understand, perhaps for the first time, the full meaning of grace. An Almodóvar screenplay is a running leap off a Gaudi balcony, it flips, soars, ascends, careens, tumbles, falls – always landing, astonishingly and astonished, on its feet.”
~ Howard A. Rodman, Announcing Almodóvar’s Jean Renoir Award