By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Screen Media Films Acquires Award-Winning Festival Favorite “SHUFFLE”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New York, March 29, 2012 – Suzanne Blech, president of Screen Media Films, has announced the acquisition of North American distribution rights to Kurt Kuenne’s thriller SHUFFLE with an eye towards a release in 3Q of 2012.  The film stars TJ Thyne as a man who wakes up at a different age in his life each morning and is seemingly helpless to stop it until he starts to see a pattern that could lead him out of the madness.

“SHUFFLE is a wonderfully imaginative thriller with twists that will challenge audiences and we are excited to introduce the film into the marketplace,” says Blech.  “Kurt Kuenne is a talent to take notice of right now.”

Filmmaker Kurt Kuenne says about the acquisition: “I’m thrilled to be working with Screen Media in bringing this film to the widest possible audience.  Suzanne Blech and her colleagues recognized and embraced this film prior to its recent shower of accolades, and that kind of belief and enthusiasm is something I respect tremendously.”

SHUFFLE is the tale of a man who begins experiencing his life out of order; every day he wakes up at a different age, on a different day of his life, never knowing where or when he’s going to be once he falls asleep.  He’s terrified and wants it to stop – until he notices a pattern in his experience, and works to uncover why this is happening to him – and what or who is behind it.

The film has received numerous awards on the festival circuit – including the Audience Award at Sedona International FF, the Director’s Spotlight Award at the Cleveland International FF, and the New Visions Award at Cinequest – in addition to playing at the following film festivals: Santa Barbara, Hollywood, Heartland (closing night film), St. Louis, Garden State (opening night film), and Atlanta. SHUFFLE will screen this weekend at the Phoenix FF and at the Vail FF, and will have its international premiere at the Brussels International Festival of Fantastic Film on April 6.

Part Twilight Zone-style mystery, part Frank Capra fantasy, SHUFFLE stars TJ Thyne, co-star of the hit TV show “Bones.”  The film’s voluminous prosthetic old age make-up was done by Barney Burman, winner of the 2010 Academy Award® for Best Make-up for “Star Trek.”  SHUFFLE was written, directed and scored by Kurt Kuenne, filmmaker of the acclaimed documentary “Dear Zachary” and the hit short film “Validation” (also starring TJ Thyne).  For more information about the film, please go to http://www.shufflethemovie.com/.

The deal was negotiated by Suzanne Blech and Seth Needle from Screen Media, and Josh Braun from Submarine on behalf of the filmmakers.

ABOUT SCREEN MEDIA

Screen Media acquires the rights to high quality, independent feature films for the US and Canada.  Screen Media’s theatrical releases include “La Mission,” starring Benjamin Bratt; “The City of Your Final Destination,” starring Anthony Hopkins and Laura Linney; “Lymelife,” starring Alec Baldwin, Emma Roberts and Cynthia Nixon and “The Private Lives of Pippa Lee” starring Robin Wright and Keanu Reeves. Since 2001, Screen Media Films has released more than 250 titles including “Noel,” starring Penelope Cruz and Susan Sarandon; “Sherrybaby,” starring Maggie Gyllenhaal; Kevin Bacon’s directorial debut, “Loverboy;” and Emmy nominated “Dog Whisperer” with Cesar Milan.

Screen Media Films is a division of Screen Media Ventures, LLC.  With a library of over 1,500 motion pictures, Screen Media Ventures is one of the largest independent suppliers of high quality motion pictures to U.S. and international broadcast markets, cable networks, home video outlets and new media venues. For more information, visit www.screenmediafilms.net.

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Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé