By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Screen Media Films Acquires Award-Winning Festival Favorite “SHUFFLE”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New York, March 29, 2012 – Suzanne Blech, president of Screen Media Films, has announced the acquisition of North American distribution rights to Kurt Kuenne’s thriller SHUFFLE with an eye towards a release in 3Q of 2012.  The film stars TJ Thyne as a man who wakes up at a different age in his life each morning and is seemingly helpless to stop it until he starts to see a pattern that could lead him out of the madness.

“SHUFFLE is a wonderfully imaginative thriller with twists that will challenge audiences and we are excited to introduce the film into the marketplace,” says Blech.  “Kurt Kuenne is a talent to take notice of right now.”

Filmmaker Kurt Kuenne says about the acquisition: “I’m thrilled to be working with Screen Media in bringing this film to the widest possible audience.  Suzanne Blech and her colleagues recognized and embraced this film prior to its recent shower of accolades, and that kind of belief and enthusiasm is something I respect tremendously.”

SHUFFLE is the tale of a man who begins experiencing his life out of order; every day he wakes up at a different age, on a different day of his life, never knowing where or when he’s going to be once he falls asleep.  He’s terrified and wants it to stop – until he notices a pattern in his experience, and works to uncover why this is happening to him – and what or who is behind it.

The film has received numerous awards on the festival circuit – including the Audience Award at Sedona International FF, the Director’s Spotlight Award at the Cleveland International FF, and the New Visions Award at Cinequest – in addition to playing at the following film festivals: Santa Barbara, Hollywood, Heartland (closing night film), St. Louis, Garden State (opening night film), and Atlanta. SHUFFLE will screen this weekend at the Phoenix FF and at the Vail FF, and will have its international premiere at the Brussels International Festival of Fantastic Film on April 6.

Part Twilight Zone-style mystery, part Frank Capra fantasy, SHUFFLE stars TJ Thyne, co-star of the hit TV show “Bones.”  The film’s voluminous prosthetic old age make-up was done by Barney Burman, winner of the 2010 Academy Award® for Best Make-up for “Star Trek.”  SHUFFLE was written, directed and scored by Kurt Kuenne, filmmaker of the acclaimed documentary “Dear Zachary” and the hit short film “Validation” (also starring TJ Thyne).  For more information about the film, please go to http://www.shufflethemovie.com/.

The deal was negotiated by Suzanne Blech and Seth Needle from Screen Media, and Josh Braun from Submarine on behalf of the filmmakers.

ABOUT SCREEN MEDIA

Screen Media acquires the rights to high quality, independent feature films for the US and Canada.  Screen Media’s theatrical releases include “La Mission,” starring Benjamin Bratt; “The City of Your Final Destination,” starring Anthony Hopkins and Laura Linney; “Lymelife,” starring Alec Baldwin, Emma Roberts and Cynthia Nixon and “The Private Lives of Pippa Lee” starring Robin Wright and Keanu Reeves. Since 2001, Screen Media Films has released more than 250 titles including “Noel,” starring Penelope Cruz and Susan Sarandon; “Sherrybaby,” starring Maggie Gyllenhaal; Kevin Bacon’s directorial debut, “Loverboy;” and Emmy nominated “Dog Whisperer” with Cesar Milan.

Screen Media Films is a division of Screen Media Ventures, LLC.  With a library of over 1,500 motion pictures, Screen Media Ventures is one of the largest independent suppliers of high quality motion pictures to U.S. and international broadcast markets, cable networks, home video outlets and new media venues. For more information, visit www.screenmediafilms.net.

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch