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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF: Killer Joe, director Freidkin, writer Letts, editor Navarro, actors Hirsch & Temple

Shot in Toronto, Sept 2011 – Director William Friedkin, writer Tracy Letts, editor Darrin Navarro, and actors Emile Hirsch & Juno Temple

3 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF: Killer Joe, director Freidkin, writer Letts, editor Navarro, actors Hirsch & Temple”

  1. Joe Leydon says:

    BTW: Killer Joe will be screened at SXSW next weekend.

  2. sanj says:

    audio isn’t the greatest – a bit of echo int the room

    the lamp thing was fun but could have been funnier ..

    did Juno Temple not see any blurays at all ? seemed that way. Juno seemed 50% less animated and happy with this one
    than the other dp/30’s she did.

    also its too bad DP didn’t ask about the background buildings. just reminds me of the last 1 minute of fight club except its not dark ..

    i couldn’t find too many video for the play this is based on on youtube . how popular is this ?

    wouldn’t it make sense for this to go to HBO instead of
    going to theatres ? are they expecting one actor to
    hit oscar ? like how Kidman did with Rabbit Hole…
    which i didn’t really like and it did seem like oscar bait ..

  3. SamLowry says:

    sanj, I wasn’t really thinking about the audio. I was thinking more about the lighting, and whether the fidgety Ms. Temple was itching to give us a “Basic Instinct” moment if only she had been frontlit a little better.

    JUST LOOK AT HER!

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You worked as second AD on Jerry Lewis’ The Day the Clown Cried,  about a clown entertaining Jewish children in a WW II concentration camp. 
Yes, and I never saw the film. I was just the second assistant and it was an incredible fairytale for me, to work with Jerry Lewis. Jerry Lewis, along with Louis de Funes—who, by the way, had a very similar career to Jerry Lewis. He was a huge comic in France, but never, ever until now, 20 years after his death, recognized as a great actor. But they both made me laugh as a child. Jerry Lewis did everything: he did stand-up. He could act. He could sing and dance. He’s a photographer. He’s a director. And his films, when you look at them, are extremely daring and inventive. So he was someone that I wanted to emulate, in a way. The cinematographer of the film, Edmond Richard, who had shot a film I worked on directed by Rene Clement, called Hope to Die, with Jean-Louis Trintignant, Aldo Ray and Robert Ryan. It was like I had been invited to the court of Queen Elizabeth. It felt like a real achievement. I tried to work as hard as possible, and be very speedy. Like the weather, you don’t wait for somebody to ask. The moment the director says “I would like to have a…” you know what needs and get it for him. The greatest moment on that set for me was, one day Jerry Lewis got really upset with his crew, and went off on them, saying “You’re all too lazy. You don’t work hard enough. There’s only one guy who understands!” And he pointed to me. I only worked on the film for 15 days, at the circus in Paris. I never heard a thing about it after. I knew it was bogged down in lawsuits after it was finished, but it was an important moment in my professional life. I worked with a lot of amazing people before I directed my first film. I was an assistant director for twelve years. It was a great training ground, watching those masters work. I have many great memories. I started making films very late, you know.”
~ Jean-Jacques Beineix

“A shot is a story. A shot on its own should be a piece of a story. Which is why I talk a lot about watching films, even the films we’re working on, with the sound off. Just to analyze how the film works, because a film should work for an audience without any sound. The biggest problem I see is that someone may have a superficial understanding of what a shot is propositionally, but they don’t have an understanding of how all of these shots are part of a family that needs to connect, and so you’ll get something that’s like a sentence arranged poorly with six nouns in a row. That surprises me, because I think that’s something that can be learned. Some things can’t be, but that can. It’s a grammar. In a classroom I could walk somebody through the difference between a sequence in which the filmmaker has a deep understanding of how images connect, and someone who doesn’t. It’s not really an intellectual process. Some people are just born with it and are just sort of savants at that deep mathematical understanding of shot construction.  I’m better than I used to be, but there are some people I’m just never going to catch. Spielberg. His staging ability. I’m never going to catch him. But when you’re trying to figure out how to get better—I’m not competitive in the sense of looking around at other filmmakers and comparing myself to them. What I do have to think about in trying to navigate myself through a career is: what can I get better at, and what do I have that I can enhance that somebody else doesn’t have?”
~ Steven Soderbergh