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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ TIFF: Killer Joe, director Freidkin, writer Letts, editor Navarro, actors Hirsch & Temple

Shot in Toronto, Sept 2011 – Director William Friedkin, writer Tracy Letts, editor Darrin Navarro, and actors Emile Hirsch & Juno Temple

3 Responses to “DP/30 @ TIFF: Killer Joe, director Freidkin, writer Letts, editor Navarro, actors Hirsch & Temple”

  1. Joe Leydon says:

    BTW: Killer Joe will be screened at SXSW next weekend.

  2. sanj says:

    audio isn’t the greatest – a bit of echo int the room

    the lamp thing was fun but could have been funnier ..

    did Juno Temple not see any blurays at all ? seemed that way. Juno seemed 50% less animated and happy with this one
    than the other dp/30’s she did.

    also its too bad DP didn’t ask about the background buildings. just reminds me of the last 1 minute of fight club except its not dark ..

    i couldn’t find too many video for the play this is based on on youtube . how popular is this ?

    wouldn’t it make sense for this to go to HBO instead of
    going to theatres ? are they expecting one actor to
    hit oscar ? like how Kidman did with Rabbit Hole…
    which i didn’t really like and it did seem like oscar bait ..

  3. SamLowry says:

    sanj, I wasn’t really thinking about the audio. I was thinking more about the lighting, and whether the fidgety Ms. Temple was itching to give us a “Basic Instinct” moment if only she had been frontlit a little better.

    JUST LOOK AT HER!

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