By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

ACADEMY ANNOUNCES PROMOTIONS FOR SCOTT MILLER AND KIMBERLY ROUSH

March 28, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has promoted Scott Miller and Kimberly Roush to senior management positions, COO Ric Robertson announced today. Miller, who will continue to serve as Assistant General Counsel, has also assumed the role of Managing Director of Administration, while Roush has been elevated to Managing Director of Membership and Awards. Both will report directly to Robertson.

Miller has held the position of Assistant General Counsel since 2002. In this capacity, he oversees all contract negotiations, directs global trademark enforcement, and provides key legal support in the production of the annual Academy Awards® show. In his new position, Miller adds senior administrative responsibilities such as campaign regulations and compliance, building and theater operations, and Oscar® statuette manufacture and distribution. “Scott has played a crucial and effective role in protecting our work and our brand. This expanded position will allow him to apply his energies and intelligence to an even wider array of Academy operations,” said Robertson.

Roush has served as Director of Membership since joining the Academy staff in 2008. She manages all activities related to the organization’s global membership of more than 6,000 leading motion picture professionals, including new member selection, branch committees and member communications and events, and balloting. She also supervises the coordination of the Governors Ball as well as the Governors Awards.

In her new role, Roush adds oversight of the seven-person awards department and its work, which includes the Academy Awards rules, Awards categories, the Scientific and Technical Awards, and the Student Academy Awards, as well as all awards-related activities within the member branches. Prior to joining the Academy staff, Roush spent 12 years at the Telluride Film Festival, where she was the director of development, then vice president and director of development and communications.

“Kimberly’s remarkable leadership has been vital in improving the ways we serve our members. Her skilled management of the interwoven activities of the membership and awards departments will enable them to function even more effectively and seamlessly,” Robertson said.

# # #

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is the world’s preeminent movie-related organization, with a membership of more than 6,000 of the most accomplished men and women working in cinema. In addition to the annual Academy Awards—in which the members vote to select the nominees and winners­—the Academy presents a diverse year-round slate of public programs, exhibitions and events; provides financial support to a wide range of other movie-related organizations and endeavors; acts as a neutral advocate in the advancement of motion picture technology; and, through its Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, collects, preserves, restores and provides access to movies and items related to their history. Through these and other activities the Academy serves students, historians, the entertainment industry and people everywhere who love movies.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy

AWARDS PUBLICITY
8949 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD | BEVERLY HILLS, CA 90211-1907

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé