By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

ACADEMY ANNOUNCES PROMOTIONS FOR SCOTT MILLER AND KIMBERLY ROUSH

March 28, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has promoted Scott Miller and Kimberly Roush to senior management positions, COO Ric Robertson announced today. Miller, who will continue to serve as Assistant General Counsel, has also assumed the role of Managing Director of Administration, while Roush has been elevated to Managing Director of Membership and Awards. Both will report directly to Robertson.

Miller has held the position of Assistant General Counsel since 2002. In this capacity, he oversees all contract negotiations, directs global trademark enforcement, and provides key legal support in the production of the annual Academy Awards® show. In his new position, Miller adds senior administrative responsibilities such as campaign regulations and compliance, building and theater operations, and Oscar® statuette manufacture and distribution. “Scott has played a crucial and effective role in protecting our work and our brand. This expanded position will allow him to apply his energies and intelligence to an even wider array of Academy operations,” said Robertson.

Roush has served as Director of Membership since joining the Academy staff in 2008. She manages all activities related to the organization’s global membership of more than 6,000 leading motion picture professionals, including new member selection, branch committees and member communications and events, and balloting. She also supervises the coordination of the Governors Ball as well as the Governors Awards.

In her new role, Roush adds oversight of the seven-person awards department and its work, which includes the Academy Awards rules, Awards categories, the Scientific and Technical Awards, and the Student Academy Awards, as well as all awards-related activities within the member branches. Prior to joining the Academy staff, Roush spent 12 years at the Telluride Film Festival, where she was the director of development, then vice president and director of development and communications.

“Kimberly’s remarkable leadership has been vital in improving the ways we serve our members. Her skilled management of the interwoven activities of the membership and awards departments will enable them to function even more effectively and seamlessly,” Robertson said.

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is the world’s preeminent movie-related organization, with a membership of more than 6,000 of the most accomplished men and women working in cinema. In addition to the annual Academy Awards—in which the members vote to select the nominees and winners­—the Academy presents a diverse year-round slate of public programs, exhibitions and events; provides financial support to a wide range of other movie-related organizations and endeavors; acts as a neutral advocate in the advancement of motion picture technology; and, through its Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, collects, preserves, restores and provides access to movies and items related to their history. Through these and other activities the Academy serves students, historians, the entertainment industry and people everywhere who love movies.

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“To be a critic is to be a workaholic. Workaholism is socially conditioned: viewed favourably by exploiters, it’s generally ruinous to a worker’s mental health. When T.S. Eliot said criticism was as inevitable as breathing, he failed to mention that, respiratory problems notwithstanding, breathing is easy. Criticism is reflexive before reflective: to formalise/industrialise an involuntary instinct requires time, effort and discipline. The reason we seek remuneration, as opposed to the self-hatred of being a scab, is because all labour should be waged…

“Criticism, so the cliché by now goes, is dying. None of the panel discussions on its death agony, however—including those in which I’ve formally participated—come at it from the wider perspective that the problem surely needs. They defend the ways in which criticism functions in relation to the industry and to the public, but they fail to contextualise these relationships as defined by ultimately rotten and self-harming imperatives.

“Criticism was a noble profession so long as only a few could practice it for money; when the field expands, as it has with a so-called ‘democratisation’ of our practice, those few lose their political power. Competition grows and markets are undercut: publications are naturally going to start paying less. Precarity is both cause and effect of a surplus workforce: the reason you’re only as good as your last article is because there are plenty of other folks who can write the next one in your place. The daily grind is: pitch, or perish.

B”ut criticism, so a counter-cliché goes, is not dying. An irony: this is an elite sport that is no longer elite in terms of who is able to practice it, but in economic terms it’s clutching to a perverse and outmoded hierarchical structure. It’s more meritocratic than ever, now: which is to say it isn’t meritocratic at all. That’s a paradox in bad need of a resolution…”

~ Michael Pattison Manifestoes Film Criticism

“It’s easy to forget when you’re reading a critic every single week or multiple times a week, that most of us who do this job, and have been doing it for a long time, understand that this is basically a parasitic profession. I don’t mean in the sense that we’re evil bloodsucking creatures, but we couldn’t exist if we didn’t have something to analyze. And I’m always conscious of that. So whether I like or don’t like a particular thing you do, my point of view is always that of an appreciator. I just like to be in the world that you create.”
~ Matt Zoller Seitz To Sam Esmail

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