By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

ACADEMY ANNOUNCES PROMOTIONS FOR SCOTT MILLER AND KIMBERLY ROUSH

March 28, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has promoted Scott Miller and Kimberly Roush to senior management positions, COO Ric Robertson announced today. Miller, who will continue to serve as Assistant General Counsel, has also assumed the role of Managing Director of Administration, while Roush has been elevated to Managing Director of Membership and Awards. Both will report directly to Robertson.

Miller has held the position of Assistant General Counsel since 2002. In this capacity, he oversees all contract negotiations, directs global trademark enforcement, and provides key legal support in the production of the annual Academy Awards® show. In his new position, Miller adds senior administrative responsibilities such as campaign regulations and compliance, building and theater operations, and Oscar® statuette manufacture and distribution. “Scott has played a crucial and effective role in protecting our work and our brand. This expanded position will allow him to apply his energies and intelligence to an even wider array of Academy operations,” said Robertson.

Roush has served as Director of Membership since joining the Academy staff in 2008. She manages all activities related to the organization’s global membership of more than 6,000 leading motion picture professionals, including new member selection, branch committees and member communications and events, and balloting. She also supervises the coordination of the Governors Ball as well as the Governors Awards.

In her new role, Roush adds oversight of the seven-person awards department and its work, which includes the Academy Awards rules, Awards categories, the Scientific and Technical Awards, and the Student Academy Awards, as well as all awards-related activities within the member branches. Prior to joining the Academy staff, Roush spent 12 years at the Telluride Film Festival, where she was the director of development, then vice president and director of development and communications.

“Kimberly’s remarkable leadership has been vital in improving the ways we serve our members. Her skilled management of the interwoven activities of the membership and awards departments will enable them to function even more effectively and seamlessly,” Robertson said.

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is the world’s preeminent movie-related organization, with a membership of more than 6,000 of the most accomplished men and women working in cinema. In addition to the annual Academy Awards—in which the members vote to select the nominees and winners­—the Academy presents a diverse year-round slate of public programs, exhibitions and events; provides financial support to a wide range of other movie-related organizations and endeavors; acts as a neutral advocate in the advancement of motion picture technology; and, through its Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, collects, preserves, restores and provides access to movies and items related to their history. Through these and other activities the Academy serves students, historians, the entertainment industry and people everywhere who love movies.

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