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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

The Mister Rogers Doc You’ve Been Waiting For

6 Responses to “The Mister Rogers Doc You’ve Been Waiting For”

  1. Yancy Skancy says:

    Waiting for since “Summer 2010,” apparently.

    MisterRogers was awesome. I would occasionally watch even as an adult with no kids. I won’t say I never watched it “ironically,” but for the most part I simply respected what he did and appreciated his approach to television.

    The trailer doesn’t make this look like the most compelling documentary in the world, and I’m especially worried about the “& Me” part. (And doesn’t the title sound like an SNL parody of “Roger and Me,” with Michael Moore doing some sort of expose of MisterRogers?)

    And I bet we won’t get to see “Lady Aberlin” toting firearms, like she does in RED STATE.

  2. J says:

    Ditto to what Yancy said: The “and Me” may be trying to capture the personal nature of the project, but really fouls the atmosphere with the sort of self-promotion that’s become so relentless and tiresome. Which goes against the spirit I associate with the man.

    I’d be seven times as likely to see something simply called “Mister Rogers.”

  3. Don Lewis says:

    This clip of Mr. Rogers in the senate fighting for public television to continue to get support is pretty amazing. He was quite a guy:

  4. hoopersx says:


    Not a very thoughtful or interesting title. Be that as it may, if it’s not more about the guy making the documentary and mostly about Mr Rogers, I’m in. So many great childhood memories. I would be fascinated to learn more about the man behind the scenes.

  5. hcat says:

    This seems like some NPR segment expanded to a doc’s length.

  6. Paul D/Stella says:

    Mister Rogers was the speaker at my commencement ceremony. I can’t really remember what he talked about. My mom loved it.

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