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By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Radius-TWC Acquires BACHELORETTE

New York, NY, February 7, 2012 – The Weinstein Company (TWC) announced today that its new label, Radius-TWC, has acquired from Strategic Motion Ventures the North American distribution rights to the comedy BACHELORETTE, the debut feature from writer-director Leslye Headland. Adapted by Headland from her acclaimed stage play of the same name, BACHELORETTE had its world premiere in the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Premieres section. The film is the first to be acquired in the open marketplace by Radius-TWC, which was created in fall 2011 to bring new films and other specialty entertainment to audiences simultaneously across multiple platforms. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

A raucous comedy about a group of friends who bring decidedly mixed feelings to the task of planning a wedding, BACHELORETTE stars Kirsten Dunst (MELANCHOLIA), Isla Fisher (CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPAHOLIC), Lizzy Caplan (“New Girl”), James Marsden (ENCHANTED), Kyle Bornheimer (SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE), Rebel Wilson (BRIDESMAIDS) and Adam Scott (OUR IDIOT BROTHER). The producers are Adam McKay, Will Ferrell, Jessica Elbaum for Gary Sanchez Productions; and Brice Dal Farra, Claude Dal Farra and Lauren Munsch for BCDF Pictures. The executive producers are Gary Sanchez Productions’ Chris Henchy and BCDF Pictures’ Paul Prokop. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

Commented Quinn and Janego, “Leslye has crafted a raging, stiletto-sharp comedy populated with an indelible cast of real characters. BACHELORETTE boldly goes to places BRIDESMAIDS and HANGOVER dare not. This is destined to be one of the most talked-about films of the year and we can’t think of a more fitting film for our new label.”

In a joint statement, BCDF & Gary Sanchez Productions, stated “We are excited to have the passion of Harvey and the Radius/TWC team of Tom Quinn & Jason Janego behind the fresh talent of Leslye Headland & her ground breaking film Bachelorette. They are the perfect team to partner with on this picture and we are thrilled to be in collaboration. Their vision & expertise will broadly carry this picture to American audiences.”

The deal was negotiated for Radius-TWC by Quinn and Janego and by CAA on behalf of the filmmakers.

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“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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