By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Radius-TWC Acquires BACHELORETTE

New York, NY, February 7, 2012 – The Weinstein Company (TWC) announced today that its new label, Radius-TWC, has acquired from Strategic Motion Ventures the North American distribution rights to the comedy BACHELORETTE, the debut feature from writer-director Leslye Headland. Adapted by Headland from her acclaimed stage play of the same name, BACHELORETTE had its world premiere in the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Premieres section. The film is the first to be acquired in the open marketplace by Radius-TWC, which was created in fall 2011 to bring new films and other specialty entertainment to audiences simultaneously across multiple platforms. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

A raucous comedy about a group of friends who bring decidedly mixed feelings to the task of planning a wedding, BACHELORETTE stars Kirsten Dunst (MELANCHOLIA), Isla Fisher (CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPAHOLIC), Lizzy Caplan (“New Girl”), James Marsden (ENCHANTED), Kyle Bornheimer (SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE), Rebel Wilson (BRIDESMAIDS) and Adam Scott (OUR IDIOT BROTHER). The producers are Adam McKay, Will Ferrell, Jessica Elbaum for Gary Sanchez Productions; and Brice Dal Farra, Claude Dal Farra and Lauren Munsch for BCDF Pictures. The executive producers are Gary Sanchez Productions’ Chris Henchy and BCDF Pictures’ Paul Prokop. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

Commented Quinn and Janego, “Leslye has crafted a raging, stiletto-sharp comedy populated with an indelible cast of real characters. BACHELORETTE boldly goes to places BRIDESMAIDS and HANGOVER dare not. This is destined to be one of the most talked-about films of the year and we can’t think of a more fitting film for our new label.”

In a joint statement, BCDF & Gary Sanchez Productions, stated “We are excited to have the passion of Harvey and the Radius/TWC team of Tom Quinn & Jason Janego behind the fresh talent of Leslye Headland & her ground breaking film Bachelorette. They are the perfect team to partner with on this picture and we are thrilled to be in collaboration. Their vision & expertise will broadly carry this picture to American audiences.”

The deal was negotiated for Radius-TWC by Quinn and Janego and by CAA on behalf of the filmmakers.

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Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé