By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Radius-TWC Acquires BACHELORETTE

New York, NY, February 7, 2012 – The Weinstein Company (TWC) announced today that its new label, Radius-TWC, has acquired from Strategic Motion Ventures the North American distribution rights to the comedy BACHELORETTE, the debut feature from writer-director Leslye Headland. Adapted by Headland from her acclaimed stage play of the same name, BACHELORETTE had its world premiere in the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Premieres section. The film is the first to be acquired in the open marketplace by Radius-TWC, which was created in fall 2011 to bring new films and other specialty entertainment to audiences simultaneously across multiple platforms. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

A raucous comedy about a group of friends who bring decidedly mixed feelings to the task of planning a wedding, BACHELORETTE stars Kirsten Dunst (MELANCHOLIA), Isla Fisher (CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPAHOLIC), Lizzy Caplan (“New Girl”), James Marsden (ENCHANTED), Kyle Bornheimer (SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE), Rebel Wilson (BRIDESMAIDS) and Adam Scott (OUR IDIOT BROTHER). The producers are Adam McKay, Will Ferrell, Jessica Elbaum for Gary Sanchez Productions; and Brice Dal Farra, Claude Dal Farra and Lauren Munsch for BCDF Pictures. The executive producers are Gary Sanchez Productions’ Chris Henchy and BCDF Pictures’ Paul Prokop. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

Commented Quinn and Janego, “Leslye has crafted a raging, stiletto-sharp comedy populated with an indelible cast of real characters. BACHELORETTE boldly goes to places BRIDESMAIDS and HANGOVER dare not. This is destined to be one of the most talked-about films of the year and we can’t think of a more fitting film for our new label.”

In a joint statement, BCDF & Gary Sanchez Productions, stated “We are excited to have the passion of Harvey and the Radius/TWC team of Tom Quinn & Jason Janego behind the fresh talent of Leslye Headland & her ground breaking film Bachelorette. They are the perfect team to partner with on this picture and we are thrilled to be in collaboration. Their vision & expertise will broadly carry this picture to American audiences.”

The deal was negotiated for Radius-TWC by Quinn and Janego and by CAA on behalf of the filmmakers.

# # #

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott