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By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Radius-TWC Acquires BACHELORETTE

New York, NY, February 7, 2012 – The Weinstein Company (TWC) announced today that its new label, Radius-TWC, has acquired from Strategic Motion Ventures the North American distribution rights to the comedy BACHELORETTE, the debut feature from writer-director Leslye Headland. Adapted by Headland from her acclaimed stage play of the same name, BACHELORETTE had its world premiere in the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Premieres section. The film is the first to be acquired in the open marketplace by Radius-TWC, which was created in fall 2011 to bring new films and other specialty entertainment to audiences simultaneously across multiple platforms. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

A raucous comedy about a group of friends who bring decidedly mixed feelings to the task of planning a wedding, BACHELORETTE stars Kirsten Dunst (MELANCHOLIA), Isla Fisher (CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPAHOLIC), Lizzy Caplan (“New Girl”), James Marsden (ENCHANTED), Kyle Bornheimer (SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE), Rebel Wilson (BRIDESMAIDS) and Adam Scott (OUR IDIOT BROTHER). The producers are Adam McKay, Will Ferrell, Jessica Elbaum for Gary Sanchez Productions; and Brice Dal Farra, Claude Dal Farra and Lauren Munsch for BCDF Pictures. The executive producers are Gary Sanchez Productions’ Chris Henchy and BCDF Pictures’ Paul Prokop. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

Commented Quinn and Janego, “Leslye has crafted a raging, stiletto-sharp comedy populated with an indelible cast of real characters. BACHELORETTE boldly goes to places BRIDESMAIDS and HANGOVER dare not. This is destined to be one of the most talked-about films of the year and we can’t think of a more fitting film for our new label.”

In a joint statement, BCDF & Gary Sanchez Productions, stated “We are excited to have the passion of Harvey and the Radius/TWC team of Tom Quinn & Jason Janego behind the fresh talent of Leslye Headland & her ground breaking film Bachelorette. They are the perfect team to partner with on this picture and we are thrilled to be in collaboration. Their vision & expertise will broadly carry this picture to American audiences.”

The deal was negotiated for Radius-TWC by Quinn and Janego and by CAA on behalf of the filmmakers.

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