By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Radius-TWC Acquires BACHELORETTE

New York, NY, February 7, 2012 – The Weinstein Company (TWC) announced today that its new label, Radius-TWC, has acquired from Strategic Motion Ventures the North American distribution rights to the comedy BACHELORETTE, the debut feature from writer-director Leslye Headland. Adapted by Headland from her acclaimed stage play of the same name, BACHELORETTE had its world premiere in the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Premieres section. The film is the first to be acquired in the open marketplace by Radius-TWC, which was created in fall 2011 to bring new films and other specialty entertainment to audiences simultaneously across multiple platforms. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

A raucous comedy about a group of friends who bring decidedly mixed feelings to the task of planning a wedding, BACHELORETTE stars Kirsten Dunst (MELANCHOLIA), Isla Fisher (CONFESSIONS OF A SHOPAHOLIC), Lizzy Caplan (“New Girl”), James Marsden (ENCHANTED), Kyle Bornheimer (SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE), Rebel Wilson (BRIDESMAIDS) and Adam Scott (OUR IDIOT BROTHER). The producers are Adam McKay, Will Ferrell, Jessica Elbaum for Gary Sanchez Productions; and Brice Dal Farra, Claude Dal Farra and Lauren Munsch for BCDF Pictures. The executive producers are Gary Sanchez Productions’ Chris Henchy and BCDF Pictures’ Paul Prokop. The announcement was made by Radius-TWC Co-Presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego.

Commented Quinn and Janego, “Leslye has crafted a raging, stiletto-sharp comedy populated with an indelible cast of real characters. BACHELORETTE boldly goes to places BRIDESMAIDS and HANGOVER dare not. This is destined to be one of the most talked-about films of the year and we can’t think of a more fitting film for our new label.”

In a joint statement, BCDF & Gary Sanchez Productions, stated “We are excited to have the passion of Harvey and the Radius/TWC team of Tom Quinn & Jason Janego behind the fresh talent of Leslye Headland & her ground breaking film Bachelorette. They are the perfect team to partner with on this picture and we are thrilled to be in collaboration. Their vision & expertise will broadly carry this picture to American audiences.”

The deal was negotiated for Radius-TWC by Quinn and Janego and by CAA on behalf of the filmmakers.

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Dear Irene Cho, I will miss your energy and passion; your optimism and joy; your kindness towards friends, colleagues, strangers, struggling filmmakers, or anyone who randomly crossed your path and needed a hand. My brothers and I have long considered you another sibling in our family. Our holiday photos – both western and eastern – have you among all the cousins, in-laws, and kids… in the snow, sun, opening presents, at large dinner gatherings, playing Monopoly, breaking out pomegranate seeds and teaching us all how to dance Gangnam style. Your friendship and loyalty meant a great deal to me: you were the loudest cheerleader when I experienced victories and you were always ready with sushi when I had disappointments. You had endless crazy ideas which always seemed impossible but you would will them into existence. (Like that time you called me and suggested that we host a brunch for newly elected mayor of LA, Eric Garcetti because “he is going to president one day.” We didn’t have enough time or funding, of course, only your desire to do it. So you did, and I followed.) You created The Daily Buzz from nothing and it survived on your steam in spite of many setbacks because you believed in a platform for emerging filmmakers from all nations. Most of all, you were a wonderful mother to your son, Ethan, a devoted wife to your husband, and a wonderful sibling and daughter to your family. We will all miss how your wonderful smile and energy lit up the room and our lives. Rest in peace, Irene.
~ Rose Kuo Remembers Irene Cho on Facebook

“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas