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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Matt Labov To Academy: You Are My Bitch.

“The Academy caught wind of our idea and pulled his tickets. They went to war with us, made threats, got embarrassed, panicked, and reversed their position only after the press backlash portrayed them as stodgy. Plain and simple, that’s how it happened.”

8 Responses to “Matt Labov To Academy: You Are My Bitch.”

  1. waterbucket says:

    Am I the only one who really don’t like Sasha Cohen after this debacle? What a stunt queen.

  2. SamLowry says:

    Well, what part of his career didn’t involve stunts? Go way back to Ali G and still all he’s doing is pretending to be a real journalist to get bizarre interviews with real newsmakers.

    Take away the stunts and he’s a nobody, please.

  3. waterbucket says:

    That’s certainly true. But the other stunts were fun in spirit. This one not so much. I guess there are only so many stunts you can pull before it gets old.

  4. Ivan says:

    I think this was the deal between Sasha Baron Cohen and the Academy from the start, and it worked for both sides. I am definitely watching red carpet arrivals this year!

  5. cadavra says:

    Never liked the guy and wish Marty had cast someone else in HUGO.

  6. Joe Straatmann says:

    Even without Cohen in the role, it still would’ve felt like his character belonged in a different movie. His character seemed like he wandered out of Amelie. I could see Amelie trying to get him together with the flower girl, having it go wrong, blah blah blah. It’s weird that he’s the antagonist and he gets a scene where he gets carried off by the train where it goes a little too far. Yeah, we’re not supposed to like him at this point, but he’s also a war veteran with a disability who’s just doing his job. Was I supposed to laugh at that? It was part of the first hour that simply seemed it was setting up the movie Scorsese REALLY wanted to make.

  7. grandcosmo says:

    “Cohen said: ‘Victory is ours! Today the Mighty Nation of Wadiya triumphed over the Zionist snakes of Hollywood.'”

    Another triumph by the power of marketing.

  8. Krillian says:

    Has anyone written a column yet this year about how the Academy Awards are too white? That would be a fantastic original column.

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