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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Natural Selection, writer/director Robbie Pickering, actor Rachel Harris

A rollicking interview… these two are very funny together.

5 Responses to “DP/30: Natural Selection, writer/director Robbie Pickering, actor Rachel Harris”

  1. Peter says:

    I was wondering what happened to this film. Didn’t hear anything about since Ebertfest…hopefully will see it soon.

    Fun interview, they sound very much like a couple bickering…it’s good stuff.

  2. Joe Leydon says:

    Funnily enough, according to The Wrap, I was one of the first people to praise this movie.

    http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/good-morning-austin-march-16-sxsws-big-winner-25541

    But I’m fairly sure David is the first person to give it the video love it deserves.

  3. sanj says:

    50 minutes – longest dp/30 yet

    Robbie Pickering needs to act in sitcoms …very funny guy. he should do acting instead of directing .. it’ll make him richer probably and then he can use that tv money to direct movies. see problem solved for him.

    i want another dp/30 with him this year.

    my favorite part is “you talk”

    i give this 8/10 . would have been higher if at any point DP spent 2 minutes explaining what the movie was about without spoilers.

  4. SamLowry says:

    I watched it entirely because of Ms. Harris, the (hot) mom from the Wimpy Kid movies. Parent service at its best!

    ( http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ParentService )

    Oops, hope you had nothing to do today.

  5. Nathan Cone says:

    I was lucky enough to catch Robbie along with Rachel and Matt O’Leary on the day the film premiered last year at SXSW: http://www.tpr.org/news/2011/03/news1103222.html

    A fun interview (17 min.) at the link. I second the cheers for interview chemistry between director and stars!

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“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
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