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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Natural Selection, writer/director Robbie Pickering, actor Rachel Harris

A rollicking interview… these two are very funny together.

5 Responses to “DP/30: Natural Selection, writer/director Robbie Pickering, actor Rachel Harris”

  1. Peter says:

    I was wondering what happened to this film. Didn’t hear anything about since Ebertfest…hopefully will see it soon.

    Fun interview, they sound very much like a couple bickering…it’s good stuff.

  2. Joe Leydon says:

    Funnily enough, according to The Wrap, I was one of the first people to praise this movie.

    http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/good-morning-austin-march-16-sxsws-big-winner-25541

    But I’m fairly sure David is the first person to give it the video love it deserves.

  3. sanj says:

    50 minutes – longest dp/30 yet

    Robbie Pickering needs to act in sitcoms …very funny guy. he should do acting instead of directing .. it’ll make him richer probably and then he can use that tv money to direct movies. see problem solved for him.

    i want another dp/30 with him this year.

    my favorite part is “you talk”

    i give this 8/10 . would have been higher if at any point DP spent 2 minutes explaining what the movie was about without spoilers.

  4. SamLowry says:

    I watched it entirely because of Ms. Harris, the (hot) mom from the Wimpy Kid movies. Parent service at its best!

    ( http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ParentService )

    Oops, hope you had nothing to do today.

  5. Nathan Cone says:

    I was lucky enough to catch Robbie along with Rachel and Matt O’Leary on the day the film premiered last year at SXSW: http://www.tpr.org/news/2011/03/news1103222.html

    A fun interview (17 min.) at the link. I second the cheers for interview chemistry between director and stars!

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