By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

FIJI Water to Make Debut as the Official Water of the Screen Actors Guild Awards

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The 18th Annual SAG Awards® will be Simulcast Live on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012 on TNT and TBS at 8 p.m. (ET)/5 p.m. (PT)

LOS ANGELES (Jan. 9, 2012) – FIJI Water will serve as the official water for the 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards to honor the charitable work of actors and of the Screen Actors Guild Foundation, SAG Awards Committee Chair and SAG Foundation President JoBeth Williams announced today. FIJI Water, the number one imported bottled water, will be served on the red carpet, featured on the dinner tables during the award show ceremony and served at the Screen Actors Guild Post-Awards Gala hosted by People Magazine and the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF). This marks the first time FIJI Water has served as a SAG Awards sponsor and a donor to the SAG Foundation’s children’s literacy and actor assistance programs.

FIJI Water is making its Hollywood debut on the SAG Awards red carpet with its unique mineral profile and distinctive taste.  Drawn from a protected, underground aquifer on the Fijian island of Viti Levu, FIJI Water is bottled directly at the source, ensuring that it’s untouched.   FIJI Water is rich in naturally-occurring silica and electrolytes, which creates the soft mouth-feel and smooth taste that appeals to discerning consumers and top chefs.

“FIJI Water is proud to support the good works of the SAG Foundation and to be partnering with the Screen Actors Guild to showcase our product on one of Hollywood’s biggest nights” said David Ricanati, President, FIJI Water Company.  “FIJI Water is the perfect red carpet accessory.”

“We are grateful to FIJI Water for their support of the SAG Foundation and are delighted to welcome them to the SAG Awards” said SAG Awards Committee Chair and SAG Foundation President JoBeth Williams”

The SAG Foundation provides emergency relief to members in economic distress, video and audio preservation of the creative legacy of SAG members, scholarships for performers and their children and emergency funds for members with catastrophic illnesses. The SAG Foundation operates The Actor’s Center and the Foundation’s public children’s literacy programs: BookPALS (Performing Artists for Literacy in Schools) and Storyline Online. For details, visit sagfoundation.org and bookpals.net.

Actor® recipients will be announced at the 18th Screen Actors Guild Awards ceremony on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012, simulcast live from the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center on TNT and TBS at 8 p.m. (ET) / 5 p.m. (PT). A primetime encore presentation will follow immediately on TNT at 10 p.m. (ET) / 7 p.m. (PT).

Preceding the SAG Awards® ceremony will be the annual tnt.tv and tbs.com Red Carpet Pre-show webcast at 6:00 p.m. (ET) / 3:00 p.m. (PT) featuring the announcement of the SAG Honors for Outstanding Action Performances by Film and Television Stunt Ensembles at 6:15 p.m. (ET) / 3:15 p.m. (PT).

The 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards will be produced by Jeff Margolis Productions in association with Screen Actors Guild Awards®, LLC. For more information about the SAG Awards, SAG, TNT and TBS, visit sagawards.org/about, “like” SAG Awards at facebook.com/sagawardsofficialpage and follow SAG Awards at twitter.com/sagawards.

FIJI® Water, natural artesian water bottled at the source in Viti Levu (Fiji islands), is the number one imported bottled water in the United States. FIJI Water is known for its iconic square bottle, soft mouthfeel and unique mineral profile.  Widely available at fine restaurants and hotels, all major retail channels including grocery and convenience, and through a convenient delivery service, FIJI Water has also expanded globally to more than 40 countries. Through membership in 1% for the Planet, FIJI Water supports environmental efforts around the world and in its backyard. To learn more, please visitwww.fijiwater.com, like FIJI Water on Facebook (www.facebook.com/fijiwater), or follow FIJI Water on Twitter (www.twitter.com/fijiwater).

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