MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30: War Horse, Team Kaminski, Kahn, Carter, Burwell

3 Responses to “DP/30: War Horse, Team Kaminski, Kahn, Carter, Burwell”

  1. Edward Wilson says:

    Initially, when I saw ‘Carter’ and ‘Burwell’ I put them together as Carter Burwell. But that wouldn’t have made sense, since this is Spielberg not the Coens.

  2. Hallick says:

    “Initially, when I saw ‘Carter’ and ‘Burwell’ I put them together as Carter Burwell. But that wouldn’t have made sense, since this is Spielberg not the Coens.”

    I wondered the same thing and at first I thought, well, it must be a last name-comma-first name trick, but that didn’t make sense either.

    On a side note, some of the worst movie music of 2011 was inexplicably Carter Burwell’s score for Breaking Dawn Pt. I. I literally believed it had to be some feminine hygiene commercial composing hack also named Carter Burwell in one of those Paul Anderson/Paul Thomas Anderson/Paul W.S. Anderson situations. I’m not quite ready to stop believing this either.

  3. The Pope says:

    A pleasure as always, thank you David.

    Why the dissolve around 32 mins? The lights faded.

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray