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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30: War Horse, Team Kaminski, Kahn, Carter, Burwell

3 Responses to “DP/30: War Horse, Team Kaminski, Kahn, Carter, Burwell”

  1. Edward Wilson says:

    Initially, when I saw ‘Carter’ and ‘Burwell’ I put them together as Carter Burwell. But that wouldn’t have made sense, since this is Spielberg not the Coens.

  2. Hallick says:

    “Initially, when I saw ‘Carter’ and ‘Burwell’ I put them together as Carter Burwell. But that wouldn’t have made sense, since this is Spielberg not the Coens.”

    I wondered the same thing and at first I thought, well, it must be a last name-comma-first name trick, but that didn’t make sense either.

    On a side note, some of the worst movie music of 2011 was inexplicably Carter Burwell’s score for Breaking Dawn Pt. I. I literally believed it had to be some feminine hygiene commercial composing hack also named Carter Burwell in one of those Paul Anderson/Paul Thomas Anderson/Paul W.S. Anderson situations. I’m not quite ready to stop believing this either.

  3. The Pope says:

    A pleasure as always, thank you David.

    Why the dissolve around 32 mins? The lights faded.

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