MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30: War Horse, Team Kaminski, Kahn, Carter, Burwell

3 Responses to “DP/30: War Horse, Team Kaminski, Kahn, Carter, Burwell”

  1. Edward Wilson says:

    Initially, when I saw ‘Carter’ and ‘Burwell’ I put them together as Carter Burwell. But that wouldn’t have made sense, since this is Spielberg not the Coens.

  2. Hallick says:

    “Initially, when I saw ‘Carter’ and ‘Burwell’ I put them together as Carter Burwell. But that wouldn’t have made sense, since this is Spielberg not the Coens.”

    I wondered the same thing and at first I thought, well, it must be a last name-comma-first name trick, but that didn’t make sense either.

    On a side note, some of the worst movie music of 2011 was inexplicably Carter Burwell’s score for Breaking Dawn Pt. I. I literally believed it had to be some feminine hygiene commercial composing hack also named Carter Burwell in one of those Paul Anderson/Paul Thomas Anderson/Paul W.S. Anderson situations. I’m not quite ready to stop believing this either.

  3. The Pope says:

    A pleasure as always, thank you David.

    Why the dissolve around 32 mins? The lights faded.

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver