Z

By Laura Rooney laura@moviecitynews.com

Women Film Critics Circle Awards 2011

BEST MOVIE BY A WOMAN: TIE*
   The Iron Lady
   We Need To Talk About Kevin

BEST MOVIE ABOUT WOMEN:
   The Help

BEST STORYTELLER:
   The Iron Lady: Abi Morgan

BEST ACTRESS:
   Viola Davis: The Help
 

BEST ACTOR:
   George Clooney: The Descendants

BEST COMEDIC ACTRESS:
   Melissa McCarthy: Bridesmaids

BEST YOUNG ACTRESS:
   Shailene Woodley: The Descendants

BEST FOREIGN FILM:
   The Hedgehog

BEST FEMALE IMAGES:
   The Whistleblower

WORST FEMALE IMAGES:
   Melancholia

BEST MALE IMAGES:
   The Descendants

WORST MALE IMAGES:
   Hangover 2   

BEST DOCUMENTARY BY OR ABOUT WOMEN:
   Semper Fi: Always Faithful

BEST FAMILY FILM:
   Hugo

BEST ANIMATED FEMALES

   Puss ‘N Boots 3D

BEST EQUALITY OF THE SEXES:
   The Debt

COURAGE IN ACTING:
   Glenn Close: Albert Nobbs

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD: Tie*
   Hiam Abbass: Miral
   Michelle Williams: Meek’s Cutoff

BEST UNRELEASED MOVIE:
   Miss Representation

WOMEN’S WORK: BEST FEMALE ENSEMBLE:
   The Help

BEST SCREEN COUPLE:
   The Artist: Berenice Bejo and Jean Dujardin

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: Tie*
   Kathy Bates
   Cicely Tyson

ACTING AND ACTIVISM AWARD:

   Elizabeth Taylor

ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD
   The Whistleblower

JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD
   The Help

KAREN MORLEY AWARD
   Albert Nobbs

MOMMIE DEAREST WORST SCREEN MOM OF THE YEAR AWARD
   Judi Dench: J. Edgar
     

*ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD: For a film that most passionately opposes violence against women

*JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD: For best expressing the woman of color experience in America

*KAREN MORLEY AWARD: For best exemplifying a woman’s place in history or society, and a courageous search for identity

*COURAGE IN ACTING [Taking on unconventional roles that radically redefine the images of women on screen]

*THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD [Performance by a woman whose exceptional impact on the film dramatically, socially or historically, has been ignored]

Leave a Reply

Z

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The core fear is what can happen to you, personally. Your body. That’s what horror films deal with, precisely. We are a very thin skin wrapped around a pumping heart and guts. At any given moment it can come down to that, be it diseases, or somebody’s assault, or war, or a car wreck. You could be reduced to the simple laws of physics and your body’s vulnerability. The edged weapon is the penultimate weapon to disclose that reality to you.”
~ Wes Craven, 1996, promoting Scream

MAMET
Well, that, to me, is always the trick of dramaturgy; theoretically, perfectly, what one wants to do is put the protagonist and the audience in exactly the same position. The main question in drama, the way I was taught, is always what does the protagonist want. That’s what drama is. It comes down to that. It’s not about theme, it’s not about ideas, it’s not about setting, but what the protagonist wants. What gives rise to the drama, what is the precipitating event, and how, at the end of the play, do we see that event culminated? Do we see the protagonist’s wishes fulfilled or absolutely frustrated? That’s the structure of drama. You break it down into three acts.

INTERVIEWER
Does this explain why your plays have so little exposition?

MAMET
Yes. People only speak to get something. If I say, Let me tell you a few things about myself, already your defenses go up; you go, Look, I wonder what he wants from me, because no one ever speaks except to obtain an objective. That’s the only reason anyone ever opens their mouth, onstage or offstage. They may use a language that seems revealing, but if so, it’s just coincidence, because what they’re trying to do is accomplish an objective… The question is where does the dramatist have to lead you? Answer: the place where he or she thinks the audience needs to be led. But what does the character think? Does the character need to convey that information? If the answer is no, then you’d better cut it out, because you aren’t putting the audience in the same position with the protagonist. You’re saying, in effect, Let’s stop the play. That’s what the narration is doing—stopping the play… It’s action, as Aristotle said. That’s all that it is—exactly what the person does. It’s not what they “think,” because we don’t know what they think. It’s not what they say. It’s what they do, what they’re physically trying to accomplish on the stage. Which is exactly the same way we understand a person’s character in life—not by what they say, but by what they do. Say someone came up to you and said, I’m glad to be your neighbor because I’m a very honest man. That’s my character. I’m honest, I like to do things, I’m forthright, I like to be clear about everything, I like to be concise. Well, you really don’t know anything about that guy’s character. Or the person is onstage, and the playwright has him or her make those same claims in several subtle or not-so-subtle ways, the audience will say, Oh yes, I understand their character now; now I understand that they are a character. But in fact you don’t understand anything. You just understand that they’re jabbering to try to convince you of something.
~ David Mamet

Z Z