By Laura Rooney laura@moviecitynews.com

Women Film Critics Circle Awards 2011

BEST MOVIE BY A WOMAN: TIE*
   The Iron Lady
   We Need To Talk About Kevin

BEST MOVIE ABOUT WOMEN:
   The Help

BEST STORYTELLER:
   The Iron Lady: Abi Morgan

BEST ACTRESS:
   Viola Davis: The Help
 

BEST ACTOR:
   George Clooney: The Descendants

BEST COMEDIC ACTRESS:
   Melissa McCarthy: Bridesmaids

BEST YOUNG ACTRESS:
   Shailene Woodley: The Descendants

BEST FOREIGN FILM:
   The Hedgehog

BEST FEMALE IMAGES:
   The Whistleblower

WORST FEMALE IMAGES:
   Melancholia

BEST MALE IMAGES:
   The Descendants

WORST MALE IMAGES:
   Hangover 2   

BEST DOCUMENTARY BY OR ABOUT WOMEN:
   Semper Fi: Always Faithful

BEST FAMILY FILM:
   Hugo

BEST ANIMATED FEMALES

   Puss ‘N Boots 3D

BEST EQUALITY OF THE SEXES:
   The Debt

COURAGE IN ACTING:
   Glenn Close: Albert Nobbs

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD: Tie*
   Hiam Abbass: Miral
   Michelle Williams: Meek’s Cutoff

BEST UNRELEASED MOVIE:
   Miss Representation

WOMEN’S WORK: BEST FEMALE ENSEMBLE:
   The Help

BEST SCREEN COUPLE:
   The Artist: Berenice Bejo and Jean Dujardin

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: Tie*
   Kathy Bates
   Cicely Tyson

ACTING AND ACTIVISM AWARD:

   Elizabeth Taylor

ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD
   The Whistleblower

JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD
   The Help

KAREN MORLEY AWARD
   Albert Nobbs

MOMMIE DEAREST WORST SCREEN MOM OF THE YEAR AWARD
   Judi Dench: J. Edgar
     

*ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD: For a film that most passionately opposes violence against women

*JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD: For best expressing the woman of color experience in America

*KAREN MORLEY AWARD: For best exemplifying a woman’s place in history or society, and a courageous search for identity

*COURAGE IN ACTING [Taking on unconventional roles that radically redefine the images of women on screen]

*THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD [Performance by a woman whose exceptional impact on the film dramatically, socially or historically, has been ignored]

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas