By Laura Rooney laura@moviecitynews.com

Women Film Critics Circle Awards 2011

BEST MOVIE BY A WOMAN: TIE*
   The Iron Lady
   We Need To Talk About Kevin

BEST MOVIE ABOUT WOMEN:
   The Help

BEST STORYTELLER:
   The Iron Lady: Abi Morgan

BEST ACTRESS:
   Viola Davis: The Help
 

BEST ACTOR:
   George Clooney: The Descendants

BEST COMEDIC ACTRESS:
   Melissa McCarthy: Bridesmaids

BEST YOUNG ACTRESS:
   Shailene Woodley: The Descendants

BEST FOREIGN FILM:
   The Hedgehog

BEST FEMALE IMAGES:
   The Whistleblower

WORST FEMALE IMAGES:
   Melancholia

BEST MALE IMAGES:
   The Descendants

WORST MALE IMAGES:
   Hangover 2   

BEST DOCUMENTARY BY OR ABOUT WOMEN:
   Semper Fi: Always Faithful

BEST FAMILY FILM:
   Hugo

BEST ANIMATED FEMALES

   Puss ‘N Boots 3D

BEST EQUALITY OF THE SEXES:
   The Debt

COURAGE IN ACTING:
   Glenn Close: Albert Nobbs

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD: Tie*
   Hiam Abbass: Miral
   Michelle Williams: Meek’s Cutoff

BEST UNRELEASED MOVIE:
   Miss Representation

WOMEN’S WORK: BEST FEMALE ENSEMBLE:
   The Help

BEST SCREEN COUPLE:
   The Artist: Berenice Bejo and Jean Dujardin

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: Tie*
   Kathy Bates
   Cicely Tyson

ACTING AND ACTIVISM AWARD:

   Elizabeth Taylor

ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD
   The Whistleblower

JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD
   The Help

KAREN MORLEY AWARD
   Albert Nobbs

MOMMIE DEAREST WORST SCREEN MOM OF THE YEAR AWARD
   Judi Dench: J. Edgar
     

*ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD: For a film that most passionately opposes violence against women

*JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD: For best expressing the woman of color experience in America

*KAREN MORLEY AWARD: For best exemplifying a woman’s place in history or society, and a courageous search for identity

*COURAGE IN ACTING [Taking on unconventional roles that radically redefine the images of women on screen]

*THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD [Performance by a woman whose exceptional impact on the film dramatically, socially or historically, has been ignored]

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“Almodóvar–the first name is almost unnecessary–is a genius, is a flower, is a guiding light: the last, best son of Buñuel and so much more than that. His screenplays, which he directs with passion and fine care, have taught us about the exteriors of his native land and the interiors of our own hearts. From the early, manic experimental Super-8 work to the breakthrough Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, his titles are as evocative as most people’s screenplays. Yet for all their antic energy, Almodóvar’s films are deeply spiritual: watching his disturbing, mysterious, heart-rending Talk to Her is to understand, perhaps for the first time, the full meaning of grace. An Almodóvar screenplay is a running leap off a Gaudi balcony, it flips, soars, ascends, careens, tumbles, falls – always landing, astonishingly and astonished, on its feet.”
~ Howard A. Rodman, Announcing Almodóvar’s Jean Renoir Award

“I got a feeling I am going to win in the long run, but I want to be part of the zeitgeist, too. I want to support young girls who are in their 20s now and tell them: You’re not just imagining things. It’s tough. Everything that a guy says once, you have to say five times. Girls now are also faced with different problems. I’ve been guilty of one thing: After being the only girl in bands for 10 years, I learned—the hard way—that if I was going to get my ideas through, I was going to have to pretend that they—men—had the ideas. I became really good at this and I don’t even notice it myself. I don’t really have an ego. I’m not that bothered. I just want the whole thing to be good. And I’m not saying one bad thing about the guys who were with me in the bands, because they’re all amazing and creative, and they’re doing incredible things now. But I come from a generation where that was the only way to get things done. So I have to play stupid and just do everything with five times the amount of energy, and then it will come through.”
~ Björk to Jessica Hopper at Pitchfork