By Laura Rooney laura@moviecitynews.com

Women Film Critics Circle Awards 2011

BEST MOVIE BY A WOMAN: TIE*
   The Iron Lady
   We Need To Talk About Kevin

BEST MOVIE ABOUT WOMEN:
   The Help

BEST STORYTELLER:
   The Iron Lady: Abi Morgan

BEST ACTRESS:
   Viola Davis: The Help
 

BEST ACTOR:
   George Clooney: The Descendants

BEST COMEDIC ACTRESS:
   Melissa McCarthy: Bridesmaids

BEST YOUNG ACTRESS:
   Shailene Woodley: The Descendants

BEST FOREIGN FILM:
   The Hedgehog

BEST FEMALE IMAGES:
   The Whistleblower

WORST FEMALE IMAGES:
   Melancholia

BEST MALE IMAGES:
   The Descendants

WORST MALE IMAGES:
   Hangover 2   

BEST DOCUMENTARY BY OR ABOUT WOMEN:
   Semper Fi: Always Faithful

BEST FAMILY FILM:
   Hugo

BEST ANIMATED FEMALES

   Puss ‘N Boots 3D

BEST EQUALITY OF THE SEXES:
   The Debt

COURAGE IN ACTING:
   Glenn Close: Albert Nobbs

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD: Tie*
   Hiam Abbass: Miral
   Michelle Williams: Meek’s Cutoff

BEST UNRELEASED MOVIE:
   Miss Representation

WOMEN’S WORK: BEST FEMALE ENSEMBLE:
   The Help

BEST SCREEN COUPLE:
   The Artist: Berenice Bejo and Jean Dujardin

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: Tie*
   Kathy Bates
   Cicely Tyson

ACTING AND ACTIVISM AWARD:

   Elizabeth Taylor

ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD
   The Whistleblower

JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD
   The Help

KAREN MORLEY AWARD
   Albert Nobbs

MOMMIE DEAREST WORST SCREEN MOM OF THE YEAR AWARD
   Judi Dench: J. Edgar
     

*ADRIENNE SHELLY AWARD: For a film that most passionately opposes violence against women

*JOSEPHINE BAKER AWARD: For best expressing the woman of color experience in America

*KAREN MORLEY AWARD: For best exemplifying a woman’s place in history or society, and a courageous search for identity

*COURAGE IN ACTING [Taking on unconventional roles that radically redefine the images of women on screen]

*THE INVISIBLE WOMAN AWARD [Performance by a woman whose exceptional impact on the film dramatically, socially or historically, has been ignored]

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“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray

 

“Hollywood executives can rattle off the rules for getting a movie approved by Chinese censors: no sex (too unseemly); no ghosts (too spiritual). Among 10 prohibited plot elements are “disrupts the social order” and “jeopardizes social morality.” Time travel is frowned upon because of its premise that individuals can change history. U.S. filmmakers sometimes anticipate Chinese censors and alter movies before their release. The Oscar-winning alien-invasion drama “Arrival” was edited to make a Chinese general appear less antagonistic before the film’s debut in China this year. For “Passengers,” the space adventure starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, a scene showing Mr. Pratt’s bare backside was removed, and a scene of Mr. Pratt chatting in Mandarin with a robot bartender was added.”
~ “Hollywood’s New Script”