Utah Film Critics Association: 2011 Awards

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Utah Film Critics Association: 2011 Awards

Best Picture
Drive 

Best Achievement in Directing
Michael Hazanavicius, The Artist 

Best Lead Performance by an Actor
Joseph Gordon-Levitt: 50/50

Best Lead Performance by an Actress
Michelle Williams, My Week With Marilyn 

Best Supporting Performance by an Actor
Albert Brooks, Drive

Best Supporting Performance by an Actress
Amy Ryan, Win Win

Best Screenplay: Original
50/50

Best Screenplay: Adapted
The Descendants

Best Animated Feature
Rango

Best Non-English Language Feature
A Separation

Best Documentary
Senna

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“Let me put this bluntly, in language even a busy blogger can understand: Criticism — and its humble cousin, reviewing — is not a democratic activity. It is, or should be, an elite enterprise, ideally undertaken by individuals who bring something to the party beyond their hasty, instinctive opinions of a book (or any other cultural object). It is work that requires disciplined taste, historical and theoretical knowledge and a fairly deep sense of the author’s (or filmmaker’s or painter’s) entire body of work, among other qualities.”
~ Richard Schickel

“When Barry Jenkins introduced Moonlight, he said he hoped we see ourselves in the characters. We’re thrown into neighborhood combat with 10-year-old Chiron in Miami’s Liberty City where the empty lots, abandoned buildings, sidewalks — the shortcuts and escape routes — are his total known world. We intake vividly, like a 10-year-old, the cruel, the generous, the strangeness of others, the crack-addled neglect in a home he can’t escape. Jenkins’ characters’ lives move on, get stunted, are dulled to stupefaction, end tragically, end in separation. Moonlight is Chiron’s world. It’s the current lower-middle class, working class, disenfranchised- and-alienated-class world. Intimacy is Jenkins’ accomplishment. But, what we’re intimate with is another consciousness so totally and truthfully created, that we’re looking outward and inward simultaneously. That’s why Jenkins’ work is profound. Chiron is us and we are him, asking ourselves, ‘Who am I? Where do I fit?'”
~ Michael Mann On Moonlight