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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Trailering Tony Gatlif’s INDIGNADOS

http://vimeo.com/34377474

Premiering Berlinale 2012: Gatlif shot both a fiction and documentary version of his observation of the European “Indignados,” predecessors to the “Occupy” protests around the world. Reports Cineuropa: “According to Gatlif, Indignados “plunges into the dense and palpable reality of a Europe in revolt just to be able to live, through the gaze and illusions of Betty (Mamebetty Honoré Diallo), a young African illegal immigrant.” Travelling along the edge of the borders of a Europe on the verge of collapse in terms of its social cohesion, Betty confronts this reality and the absurd situations it creates… At the same time, Gatlif has directed the documentary Indignez-vous! for Arte.” Gatlif: “This is urgent. The disorder of financial capitalism is throwing the world and its population into a crisis that is increasingly tough for millions of people, reduced to unemployment and plunged into poverty. These dark times in which we live may lead to worse still, a surge in xenophobic and racist violence, a war of civilisation, pitting nations against other nations in the name of God, the incompatibility of cultures, or quite simply hatred of the other. Cinema, like literature, music and the other arts, must fight against this terrible outcome.”

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch