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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Trailering Tony Gatlif’s INDIGNADOS

http://vimeo.com/34377474

Premiering Berlinale 2012: Gatlif shot both a fiction and documentary version of his observation of the European “Indignados,” predecessors to the “Occupy” protests around the world. Reports Cineuropa: “According to Gatlif, Indignados “plunges into the dense and palpable reality of a Europe in revolt just to be able to live, through the gaze and illusions of Betty (Mamebetty Honoré Diallo), a young African illegal immigrant.” Travelling along the edge of the borders of a Europe on the verge of collapse in terms of its social cohesion, Betty confronts this reality and the absurd situations it creates… At the same time, Gatlif has directed the documentary Indignez-vous! for Arte.” Gatlif: “This is urgent. The disorder of financial capitalism is throwing the world and its population into a crisis that is increasingly tough for millions of people, reduced to unemployment and plunged into poverty. These dark times in which we live may lead to worse still, a surge in xenophobic and racist violence, a war of civilisation, pitting nations against other nations in the name of God, the incompatibility of cultures, or quite simply hatred of the other. Cinema, like literature, music and the other arts, must fight against this terrible outcome.”

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman