By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Nominees for Alliance of Women Film Journalists 2011 AWFJ EDA Awards


Best Film:

  • The Artist
  • The Descendants
  • Hugo
  • Melancholia
  • Midnight in Paris

Best Director:

  • Woody Allen – Midnight In Paris
  • Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist
  • Terrence Malick – Tree of Life
  • Alexander Payne – The Descendants
  • Martin Scorsese – Hugo

Best Screenplay, Original

  • The Artist – Michel Hazanavicius
  • Beginners – Mike Mills
  • Bridesmaids – Kristin Wiig and Annie Mumolo
  • Midnight in Paris – Woody Allen
  • Win Win – Thomas McCarthy

Best Screenplay, Adapted

  • The Descendants – Alexander Payne and Nat Faxon
  • Hugo – John Logan
  • Moneyball – Steven Zallian and Aaron Sorkin
  • Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy – Bridget O’Connor and Peter Straughan
  • We Need To Talk About Kevin – Lynne Ramsey and Rory Kinnear

Best Documentary

  • Bill Cunningham New York
  • Buck
  • Cave of Forgotten Dreams
  • The Interrupters
  • Pina
  • Project Nim

Best Animated Film

  • Arthur Christmas
  • Kung Fu Panda
  • Puss in Boots
  • Rango
  • Tintin

Best Actress

  • Viola Davis – Abileen Clark in The Help
  • Kirsten Dunst – Justine in Melancholia
  • Meryl Streep – Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady
  • Tilda Swinton – Eva Khatchadourian in We Need To Talk About Kevin
  • Michelle Williams – Marilyn Monroe in My Week With Marilyn

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

  • Bernice Bejo – Peppy Miller in The Artist
  • Jessica Chastain – Celia Foote in The Help
  • Janet McTeer – Hubert Page in Albert Nobbs
  • Carey Mulligan – Sissy Sullivan in Shame
  • Octavia Spencer – Minny Jackson in The Help

Best Actor

  • George Clooney – Matt King in The Descendants
  • Jean Dujardin – George Valentin in The Artist
  • Michael Fassbinder – Brandon Sullivan in Shame
  • Brad Pitt – Billy Beane in Moneyball
  • Michael Shannon – Curtis in Take Shelter

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

  • Kenneth Brannagh – Sir Laurence Olivier in My Week With Marilyn
  • Albert Brooks – Bernie Rose in Drive
  • Christopher Plummer – Hal Fields in Beginnings
  • Alan Rickman – Professor Severus Snape in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II
  • Andy Serkis – in Planet of the Apes

Best Ensemble Cast

  • Bridesmaids
  • The Descendants
  • The Help
  • Margin call
  • Midnight In Paris

Best Editing:

  • The Artist – Anne-Sophie Bion and Michel Hazanavicius
  • Girl With The Dragon Tattoo – Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall
  • Hugo – Thelma Schoonmaker
  • Tree of Life – Hank Corwin, Jay Rabinowitz, Daniel Rezende, Billy Weber, Mark Yoshikawa
  • Warhorse – Michael Kahn

Best Cinematography:

  • The Artist – Guillaume Schiffman
  • Hugo – Robert Richardson
  • Melancholia – Manuel Alberto Claro
  • Tree of life – Emmanuel Lubezki
  • Warhorse – Janusz Kaminski

Best Film Music Or Score :

  • The Artist – Ludovic Bource, Original Score
  • Girl With The Dragon Tattoo – Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Original Score
  • Hannah – The Chemical Brothers, Original Score

Best Non-English-Language Film:

  • Le Havre – Aki Kaurismaki, Finland/France
  • Pina – Wim Wenders, Germany
  • A Separation – Ashgar FarhadI, Iran
  • The Skin I Live In – Pedro Almodovar, Spain
  • Trollhunter – André Øvredal, Norway


Best Woman Director

  • Lynne Ramsey – We Need To Talk About Kevin
  • Dee Rees – Pariah
  • Vera Farmiga – Higher Ground
  • Kelly Reichardt – Meek’s Cutoff
  • Jennifer Yuh – Kung Fu Panda

Best Woman Screenwriter

  • Diablo Cody – Young Adult
  • Abi Morgan – The Iron Lady
  • Lynne Ramsey and Rory Kinnear – We Need To Talk About Kevin
  • Dee Rees – Pariah
  • Kristin Wiig and Annie Mumolo – Bridesmaids

Kick Ass Award For Best Female Action Star

  • Rooney Mara — Lisbeth Salander in Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
  • Helen Mirren – Rachel Singer in The Debt
  • Paula Patton – Jane in Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol
  • Saoirse Ronan – Hanna in Hanna
  • Zoe Saldana – Cataleya in Colombiana

Best Animated Female

  • Emily Blunt as Juliet in Gnomeo and Juliet
  • Isla Fisher as Beans in Rango
  • Anne Hathaway as Jewel in Rio
  • Salma Hayak as Kitty Softpaws in Puss in Boots
  • Angelina Jolie – Tigress in Kung Fu Panda

Best Breakthrough Performance

  • Jessica Chastain as Mrs. O’Brien in Tree of Life
  • Elizabeth Olsen as Martha, Marcy May and Marlene in Martha Marcy May Marlene
  • Adepero Oduye as Alike in Pariah
  • Rooney Mara as Lisbeth Salander in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
  • Shailene Woodley as Alexandra King in The Descendants

Female Icon Award

  • Glenn Close as Albert Nobbs in Albert Nobbs
  • Viola Davis as Abileen Clark in The Help
  • Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady

Actress Defying Age and Ageism

  • Glenn Close as Albert Nobbs in Albert Nobbs
  • Judi Dench as Anna Marie Hoover in J. Edgar Hoover
  • Helen Mirren as Rachel Singer in The Debt
  • Vanessa Redgrave as Volumnia in Coriolanus
  • Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady

This Year’s Outstanding Achievement By A Woman In The Film Industry:

  • Jessica Chastain for performances in four highly acclaimed films
  • Thelma Schoonmaker for editing Hugo
  • Stacey Snider for helming Dreamworks
  • Kristin Wiig for Bridesmaids

AWFJ Award Humanitarian Activism

  • Sandra Bullock for tsunami relief
  • Elaine Hendrix for Animal Rescue Corps and In Defense of Animals
  • Angelina Jolie for UN work and making In The Land of Milk and Blood to raise awareness about genocide.
  • Elizabeth Taylor for her work with AIDS
  • Olivia Wilde for relief work in Haiti


AWFJ Hall Of Shame Award

  • The Hollywood Reporter for failing to invite any women to join the Directors Roundtable
  • I Melt With You, production and cast
  • Jack and Jill, production and cast
  • Something Borrowed, production and cast
  • Sucker Punch, production and cast

Actress Most in Need Of A New Agent

  • Jennifer Aniston
  • Kate Hudson
  • Sarah Jessica Parker
  • Amanda Seyfried
  • All actresses in New Year’s Eve

Movie You Wanted To Love But Just Couldn’t:

  • Drive
  • The Future
  • Sucker Punch
  • Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy
  • Young Adult

Unforgettable Moment Award:

  • The Artist – The sound of glass clinking on the table
  • Drive – The elevator scene
  • Girl With The Dragon Tattoo – Lisbeth’s revenge
  • The Help – The pie scene
  • Shame – Carey Mulligan singing New York, New York

Best Depiction Of Nudity, Sexuality, or Seduction:

  • A Dangerous Method – Carl Jung spanks Sabina Speilrein
  • Girl With the Dragon Tattoo — Lisbeth mounts Mikael
  • Melancholia – Justine in the moonlight
  • Shame – Opening sequence on the subway train
  • Shame – Brendan with co-worker

Sequel or Remake That Shouldn’t Have Been Made Award:

  • Arthur
  • Cars 2
  • Hangover Part II
  • Hoodwinked 2
  • Transformers: Dark Side of the Moon

Most Egregious Age Difference:

  • Albert Nobbs – Glenn Close (64) and Mia Wasikowska (22)
  • Girl With The Dragon Tattoo – Daniel Craig (43) and Rooney Mara (26)
  • Midnight in Paris – Owen Wilson (43) and Léa Seydoux (26)
  • Sleeping Beauty – Emily Browning (23) and Man 1 (Peter Carroll, 1968), Man 2 (Chris Haywood, 63) and Man 3 (Hugh Keays-Byrne, 64)
  • Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 1 – Bella (18) and Edward (over 100)

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“We now have a situation where audiences very often prefer commercial trash to Bergman’s Persona or Bresson’s L’Argent. Professionals find themselves shrugging, and predicting that serious, significant works will have no success with the general public. What is the explanation? Decline of taste or impoverishment of repertoire? Neither and both. It is simply that cinema now exists, and is evolving, under new conditions. That total, enthralling impression which once overwhelmed the audiences of the 1930s was explained by the universal delight of those who were witnessing and rejoicing over the birth of a new art form, which furthermore had recently acquired sound. By the very fact of its existence this new art, which displayed a new kind of wholeness, a new kind of image, and revealed hitherto unexplored areas of reality, could not but astound its audiences and turn them into passionate enthusiasts.

Less than twenty years now separate us from the twenty-first century. In the course of its existence, through its peaks and troughs, cinema has travelled a long and tortuous path. The relationship that has grown up between artistic films and the commercial cinema is not an easy one, and the gulf between the two becomes wider every day. Nonetheless, films are being made all the time that are undoubtedly landmarks in the history of cinema. Audiences have become more discerning in their attitude to films. Cinema as such long ago ceased to amaze them as a new and original phenomenon; and at the same time it is expected to answer a far wider range of individual needs. Audiences have developed their likes and dislikes. That means that the filmmaker in turn has an audience that is constant, his own circle. Divergence of taste on the part of audiences can be extreme, and this is in no way regrettable or alarming; the fact that people have their own aesthetic criteria indicates a growth of self-awareness.

Directors are going deeper into the areas which concern them. There are faithful audiences and favorite directors, so that there is no question of thinking in terms of unqualified success with the public—that is, if one is talking about cinema not as commercial entertainment but as art. Indeed, mass popularity suggests what is known as mass culture, and not art.”
~ Andrei Tarkovsky, “Sculpting In Time”

“People seem to be watching [fewer] movies, which I think is a mistake on people’s parts, and they seem to be making more of them, which I think is okay. Some of these movies are very good. When you look at the quality of Sundance movies right now, they are a lot better than they were when I was a kid. I do think that there have been improvements artistically, but it’s tough. We’ve got a system that’s built for less movies in terms of how many curatorial standard-bearers we have in the states. It’s time for us to expand our ideas of where we find our great films in America, but that said, it’s a real hustle. I’m so happy that Factory 25 exists. If it didn’t exist, there would be so many movies that wouldn’t ever get distributed because Matt Grady is the only person who has seen the commercial potential in them. He’s preserving a very special moment in independent film history that the commercial system is not going to be preserving. He’s figuring out how to make enough money on it to save these films and get them onto people’s shelves.”
~ Homemakers‘ Colin Healey On Indie Distribution