By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL NAMES FREDERIC BOYER ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Veteran Leader of Cannes Film Festival’s Directors’ Fortnight Arrives As TFF Starts Preparations For 11th Edition in April 2012

New York, NY (Nov. 28, 2011) – The Tribeca Film Festival (TFF) announced today that Frederic Boyer, a veteran executive who most recently ran the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival, has been named Artistic Director of TFF.

Boyer will report to Nancy Schafer, Executive Director of TFF, and Geoff Gilmore, Chief Creative Officer of Tribeca Enterprises. Gilmore will take on a more active role in overseeing the Festival program, while maintaining his existing responsibilities across Tribeca Enterprises’ other businesses.

Boyer, 52, has served as Artistic Director and Head of Programming for the Directors’ Fortnight since 2009. From 2004-08, he was Head of its Film Selection Committee. He is the Artistic Director for Les Arcs European Film Festival at Les Arcs ski resort in the Alps. Before joining the Directors’ Fortnight, he created and managed Videosphere, a renowned video store in Paris with a library of some 60,000 titles, including a wide range of arthouse films.

“The Tribeca Film Festival has always been a platform for a wide spectrum of filmmaking, and Frederic shares our passion and curiosity for film and storytelling,” said Tribeca co-founder Jane Rosenthal. “We know he will make our festival team even stronger, and enhance the Tribeca experience as we enter our second decade.”

Other changes to the executive structure include the promotion of Genna Terranova, former Senior Programmer, to Director of Programming.

Boyer added, “I could not be more honored and excited to begin this new chapter at Tribeca. This Festival has matured and developed so impressively from its origins, but there are many more frontiers to explore while keeping the core focus on discovering new voices in filmmaking. I am grateful to Jane, Geoff, Nancy and the entire team for giving me the opportunity to help lead that exploration through the medium of film.”

The 11th annual Tribeca Film Festival will be held April 18-29, 2012, in New York City.

About Tribeca Film Festival

Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff founded the Tribeca Film Festival in 2001 following the attacks on the World Trade Center to spur the economic and cultural revitalization of the lower Manhattan district through an annual celebration of film, music and culture.

The Festival’s mission is to help filmmakers reach the broadest possible audience, enable the international film community and general public to experience the power of cinema and promote New York City as a major filmmaking center. Tribeca Film Festival is well known for being a diverse international film festival that supports emerging and established directors.

Since Tribeca’s founding through 2011, the Tribeca Festival has screened over 1200 films from over 80 countries and it has attracted an international audience of more than 3.5 million attendees and generated an estimated $725 million in economic activity for New York City.

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Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé