By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL NAMES FREDERIC BOYER ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Veteran Leader of Cannes Film Festival’s Directors’ Fortnight Arrives As TFF Starts Preparations For 11th Edition in April 2012

New York, NY (Nov. 28, 2011) – The Tribeca Film Festival (TFF) announced today that Frederic Boyer, a veteran executive who most recently ran the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival, has been named Artistic Director of TFF.

Boyer will report to Nancy Schafer, Executive Director of TFF, and Geoff Gilmore, Chief Creative Officer of Tribeca Enterprises. Gilmore will take on a more active role in overseeing the Festival program, while maintaining his existing responsibilities across Tribeca Enterprises’ other businesses.

Boyer, 52, has served as Artistic Director and Head of Programming for the Directors’ Fortnight since 2009. From 2004-08, he was Head of its Film Selection Committee. He is the Artistic Director for Les Arcs European Film Festival at Les Arcs ski resort in the Alps. Before joining the Directors’ Fortnight, he created and managed Videosphere, a renowned video store in Paris with a library of some 60,000 titles, including a wide range of arthouse films.

“The Tribeca Film Festival has always been a platform for a wide spectrum of filmmaking, and Frederic shares our passion and curiosity for film and storytelling,” said Tribeca co-founder Jane Rosenthal. “We know he will make our festival team even stronger, and enhance the Tribeca experience as we enter our second decade.”

Other changes to the executive structure include the promotion of Genna Terranova, former Senior Programmer, to Director of Programming.

Boyer added, “I could not be more honored and excited to begin this new chapter at Tribeca. This Festival has matured and developed so impressively from its origins, but there are many more frontiers to explore while keeping the core focus on discovering new voices in filmmaking. I am grateful to Jane, Geoff, Nancy and the entire team for giving me the opportunity to help lead that exploration through the medium of film.”

The 11th annual Tribeca Film Festival will be held April 18-29, 2012, in New York City.

About Tribeca Film Festival

Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff founded the Tribeca Film Festival in 2001 following the attacks on the World Trade Center to spur the economic and cultural revitalization of the lower Manhattan district through an annual celebration of film, music and culture.

The Festival’s mission is to help filmmakers reach the broadest possible audience, enable the international film community and general public to experience the power of cinema and promote New York City as a major filmmaking center. Tribeca Film Festival is well known for being a diverse international film festival that supports emerging and established directors.

Since Tribeca’s founding through 2011, the Tribeca Festival has screened over 1200 films from over 80 countries and it has attracted an international audience of more than 3.5 million attendees and generated an estimated $725 million in economic activity for New York City.

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