By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL NAMES FREDERIC BOYER ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Veteran Leader of Cannes Film Festival’s Directors’ Fortnight Arrives As TFF Starts Preparations For 11th Edition in April 2012

New York, NY (Nov. 28, 2011) – The Tribeca Film Festival (TFF) announced today that Frederic Boyer, a veteran executive who most recently ran the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival, has been named Artistic Director of TFF.

Boyer will report to Nancy Schafer, Executive Director of TFF, and Geoff Gilmore, Chief Creative Officer of Tribeca Enterprises. Gilmore will take on a more active role in overseeing the Festival program, while maintaining his existing responsibilities across Tribeca Enterprises’ other businesses.

Boyer, 52, has served as Artistic Director and Head of Programming for the Directors’ Fortnight since 2009. From 2004-08, he was Head of its Film Selection Committee. He is the Artistic Director for Les Arcs European Film Festival at Les Arcs ski resort in the Alps. Before joining the Directors’ Fortnight, he created and managed Videosphere, a renowned video store in Paris with a library of some 60,000 titles, including a wide range of arthouse films.

“The Tribeca Film Festival has always been a platform for a wide spectrum of filmmaking, and Frederic shares our passion and curiosity for film and storytelling,” said Tribeca co-founder Jane Rosenthal. “We know he will make our festival team even stronger, and enhance the Tribeca experience as we enter our second decade.”

Other changes to the executive structure include the promotion of Genna Terranova, former Senior Programmer, to Director of Programming.

Boyer added, “I could not be more honored and excited to begin this new chapter at Tribeca. This Festival has matured and developed so impressively from its origins, but there are many more frontiers to explore while keeping the core focus on discovering new voices in filmmaking. I am grateful to Jane, Geoff, Nancy and the entire team for giving me the opportunity to help lead that exploration through the medium of film.”

The 11th annual Tribeca Film Festival will be held April 18-29, 2012, in New York City.

About Tribeca Film Festival

Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff founded the Tribeca Film Festival in 2001 following the attacks on the World Trade Center to spur the economic and cultural revitalization of the lower Manhattan district through an annual celebration of film, music and culture.

The Festival’s mission is to help filmmakers reach the broadest possible audience, enable the international film community and general public to experience the power of cinema and promote New York City as a major filmmaking center. Tribeca Film Festival is well known for being a diverse international film festival that supports emerging and established directors.

Since Tribeca’s founding through 2011, the Tribeca Festival has screened over 1200 films from over 80 countries and it has attracted an international audience of more than 3.5 million attendees and generated an estimated $725 million in economic activity for New York City.

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch