By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL NAMES FREDERIC BOYER ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Veteran Leader of Cannes Film Festival’s Directors’ Fortnight Arrives As TFF Starts Preparations For 11th Edition in April 2012

New York, NY (Nov. 28, 2011) – The Tribeca Film Festival (TFF) announced today that Frederic Boyer, a veteran executive who most recently ran the Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival, has been named Artistic Director of TFF.

Boyer will report to Nancy Schafer, Executive Director of TFF, and Geoff Gilmore, Chief Creative Officer of Tribeca Enterprises. Gilmore will take on a more active role in overseeing the Festival program, while maintaining his existing responsibilities across Tribeca Enterprises’ other businesses.

Boyer, 52, has served as Artistic Director and Head of Programming for the Directors’ Fortnight since 2009. From 2004-08, he was Head of its Film Selection Committee. He is the Artistic Director for Les Arcs European Film Festival at Les Arcs ski resort in the Alps. Before joining the Directors’ Fortnight, he created and managed Videosphere, a renowned video store in Paris with a library of some 60,000 titles, including a wide range of arthouse films.

“The Tribeca Film Festival has always been a platform for a wide spectrum of filmmaking, and Frederic shares our passion and curiosity for film and storytelling,” said Tribeca co-founder Jane Rosenthal. “We know he will make our festival team even stronger, and enhance the Tribeca experience as we enter our second decade.”

Other changes to the executive structure include the promotion of Genna Terranova, former Senior Programmer, to Director of Programming.

Boyer added, “I could not be more honored and excited to begin this new chapter at Tribeca. This Festival has matured and developed so impressively from its origins, but there are many more frontiers to explore while keeping the core focus on discovering new voices in filmmaking. I am grateful to Jane, Geoff, Nancy and the entire team for giving me the opportunity to help lead that exploration through the medium of film.”

The 11th annual Tribeca Film Festival will be held April 18-29, 2012, in New York City.

About Tribeca Film Festival

Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Craig Hatkoff founded the Tribeca Film Festival in 2001 following the attacks on the World Trade Center to spur the economic and cultural revitalization of the lower Manhattan district through an annual celebration of film, music and culture.

The Festival’s mission is to help filmmakers reach the broadest possible audience, enable the international film community and general public to experience the power of cinema and promote New York City as a major filmmaking center. Tribeca Film Festival is well known for being a diverse international film festival that supports emerging and established directors.

Since Tribeca’s founding through 2011, the Tribeca Festival has screened over 1200 films from over 80 countries and it has attracted an international audience of more than 3.5 million attendees and generated an estimated $725 million in economic activity for New York City.

# # #

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson