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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Young Adult, writer Diablo Cody

5 Responses to “DP/30: Young Adult, writer Diablo Cody”

  1. Peter says:

    Good interview. Young Adult is the best script she has written. I am surprised no one talked about the script as a potential Academy Award nominee. It’s original and brave in some ways.

  2. Gus says:

    Is this one the “big get” you referred to earlier, or do you have someone else up your sleeve for the next week? Not a slight to Cody at all, I just have been wondering who that one is.

  3. film fanatic says:

    Given the fact that almost every big Oscar contender, save THE ARTIST, is an adaptation of some sort, I’d be really surprise if she weren’t nominated in the Original category. And she deserves to win, too, the script is exceptional (actually, in an ideal world, MARGARET would win, but we all know THAT ain’t gonna happen).

  4. Proman says:

    In the off-chance that the big get happens to be Spielberg – please ask him about the status of Interstellar and how he plans to make it happen/work it out.

    All will be forgiven.

  5. Mariamu says:

    Just saw this tonight. I am now officially a fan of Patton Oswalt.

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DP/30

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver