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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Young Adult, writer Diablo Cody

5 Responses to “DP/30: Young Adult, writer Diablo Cody”

  1. Peter says:

    Good interview. Young Adult is the best script she has written. I am surprised no one talked about the script as a potential Academy Award nominee. It’s original and brave in some ways.

  2. Gus says:

    Is this one the “big get” you referred to earlier, or do you have someone else up your sleeve for the next week? Not a slight to Cody at all, I just have been wondering who that one is.

  3. film fanatic says:

    Given the fact that almost every big Oscar contender, save THE ARTIST, is an adaptation of some sort, I’d be really surprise if she weren’t nominated in the Original category. And she deserves to win, too, the script is exceptional (actually, in an ideal world, MARGARET would win, but we all know THAT ain’t gonna happen).

  4. Proman says:

    In the off-chance that the big get happens to be Spielberg – please ask him about the status of Interstellar and how he plans to make it happen/work it out.

    All will be forgiven.

  5. Mariamu says:

    Just saw this tonight. I am now officially a fan of Patton Oswalt.

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman