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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Young Adult, writer Diablo Cody

5 Responses to “DP/30: Young Adult, writer Diablo Cody”

  1. Peter says:

    Good interview. Young Adult is the best script she has written. I am surprised no one talked about the script as a potential Academy Award nominee. It’s original and brave in some ways.

  2. Gus says:

    Is this one the “big get” you referred to earlier, or do you have someone else up your sleeve for the next week? Not a slight to Cody at all, I just have been wondering who that one is.

  3. film fanatic says:

    Given the fact that almost every big Oscar contender, save THE ARTIST, is an adaptation of some sort, I’d be really surprise if she weren’t nominated in the Original category. And she deserves to win, too, the script is exceptional (actually, in an ideal world, MARGARET would win, but we all know THAT ain’t gonna happen).

  4. Proman says:

    In the off-chance that the big get happens to be Spielberg – please ask him about the status of Interstellar and how he plans to make it happen/work it out.

    All will be forgiven.

  5. Mariamu says:

    Just saw this tonight. I am now officially a fan of Patton Oswalt.

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DP/30

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“All of the security, all of the waiters, all of the musicians … that’s 3,000 people!” The shopping required fifty tractor trailers. The are thirty gallons of cocktail sauce; 350 pounds of smoked salmon; 200 pounds of brussels sprouts, 250 pounds parmesan cheese; 3,600 eggs; 6,000 mini-brioche buns; five gallons of hot fudge; 20 pounds pickled ginger; 30 pounds edible gold dust; 7,000 miniature chocolate Oscars. There are 1,400 bottles of Piper-Heidsieck champagne and 2,200 bottles from Francis Ford Coppola’s winery. This will be served in and upon 13,000 glasses, 4,500 bamboo skewers, 4,800 ramekins and 6,000 cocktail forks.”
~ Wolfgang Puck Goes Oscar Dinner Shopping

“While these images seem to reveal all, they disclose nothing beneath the surface. All that we know is what we see onscreen and that Seberg’s face is delicate and lightly creased. She’s rarely shown smiling, although there are instances when she laughs emphatically, moments that feel uncomfortable and artificial, as if she were trying out an emotion she had forgotten. We know the texture of her skin; the patterns on the walls; the depth of field; the quality of the light; the contrast of the black-and-white film; the level of grain; the dowdiness of her clothes. She’s partial to granny dresses, or maybe they’re nightgowns, and when she stands in front of a window, the sunlight glows softly, creating a kind of ravishing halo effect: Saint Jean.”
~ Manohla Dargis On Philippe Garrel’s Les Hautes Solitudes