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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

DP/30: Shame

co-writer/director Steve McQueen, actor Michael Fassbender

actor Carey Mulligan

8 Responses to “DP/30: Shame”

  1. Paul MD (Stella's Boy) says:

    DP are these safe for people who have not seen Shame?

  2. Boo says:

    Thanks for the interview. I saw this film twice now at the festivals, two months apart. The actors have a shot but the film in the blogosphere is really borderlining between hype and buzz.

  3. berg says:

    here is joan jett and lita ford from an ABC special in the late 70s

    http://www.dangerousminds.net/comments/the_runaways_in_rock_n_roll_sports_classic

  4. David Poland says:

    Hard to say, Paul. It’s not really a “spoiler” movie. If you know the premise and that the actors are naked, you are pretty much in for experiencing it.

    On the other hand, if you don’t want to hear discussions about what the subtext might be or about thoughts behind some of the ideas presented, you might want to wait.

  5. Paul MD (Stella's Boy) says:

    Thanks DP. I wasn’t sure if it’s a spoiler movie. Wanted to ask before I listen, which I really want to do.

  6. LexG says:

    The biggest “spoiler” in all these DPs is that “Steve McQueen” isn’t some hardcore chain-smoking Irish petty thug who looks like Hardy in “Bronson,” but rather Miss Jay from Top Model.

  7. sanj says:

    i officially request that Carey Mulligan becomes the special host for dp/30 … take her to Sundance festial – let her do 8 dp/30′s with different actors / directors. it would be easy for her and she’d be fair to everybody – even if the movie aren’t great.

  8. Sam says:

    She could host them in a Wendy’s over a dollar menu business lunch!

    I hope she interviews mouth-breathers with bare feet. Every question should be about how bad they feel that Midnight In Paris smoked their trashy name-checking movies at the box office. LOOOOOOK AT HER!

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