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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Hanna, actor Saoirse Ronan

7 Responses to “DP/30: Hanna, actor Saoirse Ronan”

  1. sanj says:

    Saoirse Ronan – Lunch With David Interview

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R_jYJf79VM

    Unscripted: Saoirse Ronan, Rachel Weisz and Susan Sarandon

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PR53zEp6ng8&feature=related

  2. Tuck Pendelton says:

    SWOOON… damn i’m in love with this one.

  3. LexG says:

    I’d ask Tuck if he’s aware she’s under 18, but that’s a fact apparently lost on Ebert in his riotous review of Weir’s “The Way Back,” wherein he asks why the middle-aged cast didn’t try to hook up with the “cute girl,” meaning SR… who was like 15 when she shot that movie.

    Classic Ebert gaffe.

  4. anghus says:

    atonement is still want one of those movies i go back to because it’s so wonderfully bleak. One of the saddest movies i’ve ever seen. Such great, haunting performances by all involved.

  5. sanj says:

    right at 16 minutes…things got real and she talked about
    comedies . thats where you could have pulled out an ipad / notebook and just showed her the trailer for Sandler pictures + some older movies from Will Farrell …
    20 minutes surfing the net finding cool movie stuff to talk about and at the end you could have sung a Lady Gaga song together. that would have been awesome .

  6. Vin says:

    Dude,
    you’re a great interviewer, I’m amazed by how you make them feel at ease. They are always on defense, it’s hard to reach in but you always manage to do it.
    Congrats!
    Vin B.

  7. Olli says:

    You folks at DP/30:

    you are f….g great inverviewers. The best interviews you can get – you actually really listen to the interviewees and ask actually interesting and
    profound questions. Perfect. Go on with that.

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DP/30

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“People react primarily to direct experience and not to abstractions; it is very rare to find anyone who can become emotionally involved with an abstraction. The longer the bomb is around without anything happening, the better the job that people do in psychologically denying its existence. It has become as abstract as the fact that we are all going to die someday, which we usually do an excellent job of denying. For this reason, most people have very little interest in nuclear war. It has become even less interesting as a problem than, say, city government, and the longer a nuclear event is postponed, the greater becomes the illusion that we are constantly building up security, like interest at the bank. As time goes on, the danger increases, I believe, because the thing becomes more and more remote in people’s minds. No one can predict the panic that suddenly arises when all the lights go out — that indefinable something that can make a leader abandon his carefully laid plans. A lot of effort has gone into trying to imagine possible nuclear accidents and to protect against them. But whether the human imagination is really capable of encompassing all the subtle permutations and psychological variants of these possibilities, I doubt. The nuclear strategists who make up all those war scenarios are never as inventive as reality, and political and military leaders are never as sophisticated as they think they are.”
~ Stanley Kubrick

“You can’t make films about something the audience knows nothing about. The trick is getting the audience to tell their own stories in the story so that they know what will happen. And then, just before they get bored, you must surprise them and move the story in a new direction.”
~ Mogens Rukov

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