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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Hanna, actor Saoirse Ronan

7 Responses to “DP/30: Hanna, actor Saoirse Ronan”

  1. sanj says:

    Saoirse Ronan – Lunch With David Interview

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R_jYJf79VM

    Unscripted: Saoirse Ronan, Rachel Weisz and Susan Sarandon

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PR53zEp6ng8&feature=related

  2. Tuck Pendelton says:

    SWOOON… damn i’m in love with this one.

  3. LexG says:

    I’d ask Tuck if he’s aware she’s under 18, but that’s a fact apparently lost on Ebert in his riotous review of Weir’s “The Way Back,” wherein he asks why the middle-aged cast didn’t try to hook up with the “cute girl,” meaning SR… who was like 15 when she shot that movie.

    Classic Ebert gaffe.

  4. anghus says:

    atonement is still want one of those movies i go back to because it’s so wonderfully bleak. One of the saddest movies i’ve ever seen. Such great, haunting performances by all involved.

  5. sanj says:

    right at 16 minutes…things got real and she talked about
    comedies . thats where you could have pulled out an ipad / notebook and just showed her the trailer for Sandler pictures + some older movies from Will Farrell …
    20 minutes surfing the net finding cool movie stuff to talk about and at the end you could have sung a Lady Gaga song together. that would have been awesome .

  6. Vin says:

    Dude,
    you’re a great interviewer, I’m amazed by how you make them feel at ease. They are always on defense, it’s hard to reach in but you always manage to do it.
    Congrats!
    Vin B.

  7. Olli says:

    You folks at DP/30:

    you are f….g great inverviewers. The best interviews you can get – you actually really listen to the interviewees and ask actually interesting and
    profound questions. Perfect. Go on with that.

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“I was a brat back when I made Pootie Tang. I was dealing with people every day whose pressures I didn’t understand, and I wasn’t very nice about how I said no to them. I put myself in a position I didn’t have to be in. A lot of what makes this kind of stuff work is empathy. If you’re taking money from somebody, they have a right to look after it. It’s all just trying to be clear about the arrangement. That’s why when I set up ‘Louie,’ I just said, ‘This is what I’m comfortable doing, and if you don’t want to do it, I don’t blame you. But in exchange, I’ll take very little money.’ I was only getting $200,000 per show from them, which is insane, and it goes up just by tiny increments every year. The other part of the arrangement with FX is that if this stops working for them, they should just tell me and we’ll stop doing it. Contractually, FX has a right to demand that the scripts be filtered through them before I shoot them, just like any other show. But from the beginning, they haven’t read anything, and they like the show. If I start turning in shit, then they’re going to start asking to see scripts, and that’s perfectly fair.”
~ Louis C. K.

BOMB: Do you give a lot of direction?

ASSAYAS: I give zero indications. Nothing. To me, it’s all physical. It is all about getting the right actors. They understand the part. They’re not idiots. They’re going to sit down, and they’re going to work. They don’t need my explanations. The problem is that actors listen to directors. They respect them. So, when you say something, it becomes gospel. In a certain way, this limits their imagination. I’d rather say nothing. Then, when we shoot, I fix whatever I don’t like. I channel it as softly as I can in a direction where, maybe, there’s something to gain. But, usually, if you are working with the right people, their instinct will be correct. They will bring something of their own to the character, and to the situation. Ultimately, there will be some kind of human truth to what they are doing.
~ Olivier Assayas on directing

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