Z

By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 5, 2011
WASHINGTON, DC – Senator Chris Dodd, CEO and Chairman of the Motion Picture
Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) joined the millions worldwide who are mourning the loss of Steve Jobs, co-founder and former CEO of Apple. The following is a statement by Senator Dodd:
“The genius of Steve Jobs, a man I’ve known for 40 years, not only brought to life the visual magic and brilliant storytelling of Pixar, but brought the world one of the most innovative and successful platforms to make movies and TV available online at the click of a mouse. He was a pioneer, and helped all of us better understand how technologists and creators can work together to enrich and enliven our shared world. If anyone ever wonders whether one person can make a difference, the answer is Steve Jobs.  He will be deeply, deeply missed.”
About the MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Its members include: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal City Studios LLC; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
# # #

4 Responses to “STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING”

  1. Leo Keil says:

    I find it hard to believe that former senator Dodd knew Steve Jobs for 40 years. 40 years ago, Jobs was a high school student in California, who was still years away from starting Apple Computer.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Wow. Someone should’ve fact-checked that bromide.

  3. Matt S says:

    That number came from the same team of MPAA analysts who determine how much money their industry loses to piracy each year.

  4. JER MYNOR says:

    ANYONE WHO BELIEVES ANY WORD FROM THE MOUTH OF CHRIS DODD IS A TOTAL MORON….!!!

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
~ George Miller

“I was having issues with my script for It’s All About Love, so I called Ingmar Bergman and we ended up talking about everything but the script. He said, “Well, Festen is a masterpiece, so what are you going to do now?” At that point, I had not decided if I was going to make It’s All About Love, so I answered, “Hmmm, I don’t know. Maybe this, maybe that.” There was just a long pause, and then he said, “You’re fucked.” I said, “Well, how can you know?” “Well, Thomas, you always have to decide your next movie before the movie you’re doing presently opens.” And I said, “Why is that?” “Well, two things can happen. One thing is that you fail, and then you’ll feel scared and humiliated. It’ll get into your head. Second, and even worse, you have success, and then you’ll want more of it, or you’ll want to maintain it. But if you decide on your next film while you’re in the middle of editing, it becomes a very nonchalant choice. And then it’s shorter from the heart to the hand.”
~ Thomas Vinterberg

Z Z