By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 5, 2011
WASHINGTON, DC – Senator Chris Dodd, CEO and Chairman of the Motion Picture
Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) joined the millions worldwide who are mourning the loss of Steve Jobs, co-founder and former CEO of Apple. The following is a statement by Senator Dodd:
“The genius of Steve Jobs, a man I’ve known for 40 years, not only brought to life the visual magic and brilliant storytelling of Pixar, but brought the world one of the most innovative and successful platforms to make movies and TV available online at the click of a mouse. He was a pioneer, and helped all of us better understand how technologists and creators can work together to enrich and enliven our shared world. If anyone ever wonders whether one person can make a difference, the answer is Steve Jobs.  He will be deeply, deeply missed.”
About the MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Its members include: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal City Studios LLC; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
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4 Responses to “STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING”

  1. Leo Keil says:

    I find it hard to believe that former senator Dodd knew Steve Jobs for 40 years. 40 years ago, Jobs was a high school student in California, who was still years away from starting Apple Computer.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Wow. Someone should’ve fact-checked that bromide.

  3. Matt S says:

    That number came from the same team of MPAA analysts who determine how much money their industry loses to piracy each year.

  4. JER MYNOR says:

    ANYONE WHO BELIEVES ANY WORD FROM THE MOUTH OF CHRIS DODD IS A TOTAL MORON….!!!

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch

To me, Hunter S. Thompson was a hero. His early books were great, but in many ways, his life and career post–Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail is a cautionary tale for authors. People expected him to be high and drunk all the time and play that persona, and he stuck with that to the end, and I don’t think it was good for him. I always sort of feel mixed emotions when I hear that people went and hung out with Hunter and how great it was to get high with Hunter. The fact is the guy was having difficulty doing any sustained writing at all for years probably because so many quote, unquote, “friends” wanted to get high with him … There was a badly disappointed romantic there. I mean, that great line, “This is where the wave broke, the tide rolled back … ” This was a guy that was hurt and disappointed and very bitter about things, and it made his writing beautiful, and also with that came a lot of pain.
~ Anthony Bourdain