By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 5, 2011
WASHINGTON, DC – Senator Chris Dodd, CEO and Chairman of the Motion Picture
Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) joined the millions worldwide who are mourning the loss of Steve Jobs, co-founder and former CEO of Apple. The following is a statement by Senator Dodd:
“The genius of Steve Jobs, a man I’ve known for 40 years, not only brought to life the visual magic and brilliant storytelling of Pixar, but brought the world one of the most innovative and successful platforms to make movies and TV available online at the click of a mouse. He was a pioneer, and helped all of us better understand how technologists and creators can work together to enrich and enliven our shared world. If anyone ever wonders whether one person can make a difference, the answer is Steve Jobs.  He will be deeply, deeply missed.”
About the MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Its members include: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal City Studios LLC; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
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4 Responses to “STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING”

  1. Leo Keil says:

    I find it hard to believe that former senator Dodd knew Steve Jobs for 40 years. 40 years ago, Jobs was a high school student in California, who was still years away from starting Apple Computer.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Wow. Someone should’ve fact-checked that bromide.

  3. Matt S says:

    That number came from the same team of MPAA analysts who determine how much money their industry loses to piracy each year.

  4. JER MYNOR says:

    ANYONE WHO BELIEVES ANY WORD FROM THE MOUTH OF CHRIS DODD IS A TOTAL MORON….!!!

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Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé