By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 5, 2011
WASHINGTON, DC – Senator Chris Dodd, CEO and Chairman of the Motion Picture
Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) joined the millions worldwide who are mourning the loss of Steve Jobs, co-founder and former CEO of Apple. The following is a statement by Senator Dodd:
“The genius of Steve Jobs, a man I’ve known for 40 years, not only brought to life the visual magic and brilliant storytelling of Pixar, but brought the world one of the most innovative and successful platforms to make movies and TV available online at the click of a mouse. He was a pioneer, and helped all of us better understand how technologists and creators can work together to enrich and enliven our shared world. If anyone ever wonders whether one person can make a difference, the answer is Steve Jobs.  He will be deeply, deeply missed.”
About the MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Its members include: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal City Studios LLC; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
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4 Responses to “STATEMENT BY MPAA CHAIRMAN AND CEO SENATOR CHRIS DODD ON STEVE JOBS’ PASSING”

  1. Leo Keil says:

    I find it hard to believe that former senator Dodd knew Steve Jobs for 40 years. 40 years ago, Jobs was a high school student in California, who was still years away from starting Apple Computer.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Wow. Someone should’ve fact-checked that bromide.

  3. Matt S says:

    That number came from the same team of MPAA analysts who determine how much money their industry loses to piracy each year.

  4. JER MYNOR says:

    ANYONE WHO BELIEVES ANY WORD FROM THE MOUTH OF CHRIS DODD IS A TOTAL MORON….!!!

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick