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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya

SPOILER WARNING!!! We try not to talk about the surprises in the movie too much… but it’s impossible.

9 Responses to “DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya”

  1. jennab says:

    An EXCELLENT DP/30! Banderas is astonishingly thoughtful and articulate, with some sort of multiple for that charming accent. Anaya equally so. Movie sounds creepy as hell, but this interview may have persuaded me to see it. Well done! Did I miss the Almodovar interview, or is it coming?

  2. Bob Giovanelli says:

    I haven’t watched too many of your DP/30s, but if they’re as good as this was, I’ll keep watching. After seeing the film at the NY Film Festival press/industry screening this week, I was curious to see Antonio talk this afternoon at the Apple Store on the upper west side. Glad I watched this on a day I need to take a break from all things film festivals (combining a Hamptons Film Festival visit too this week with working NYFF)…as your interview with he and Elena was probably more entertaining than the crowded Apple Store will no doubt be in a half hour from now.

  3. Driver says:

    Broadway Bob?! Flip the block…

  4. Peter says:

    I don’t understand many critics consider The Skin I Live In as a lesser Pedro movie. If anything, it’s more entertaining and fun than most. It’s completely ludicrous, but so much fun to watch. No one can do melodrama better than Pedro.

  5. David Poland says:

    It’s a great movie. And the people who don’t enjoy it’s pleasures need the stick removed from their collective buttocks.

  6. Breedlove says:

    Almodovar is easily one of the ten best filmmakers in the world. I have a hard time picturing him making a bad movie, or even a mediocre one at this point.

  7. Krillian says:

    Kinda angry that the third act is what it is, because I read about a year ago what I thought was the basic plot; now I see it’s the Big Surprise of 2011.

  8. The Pope says:

    Sorry I’m not cheering from the gallery. I’m a big, big fan of Pedro and agree with Breedlove that he is one the ten best on the planet… but… I wasn’t involved in this one. Then again, he has been on such a searing run for the last 10 years, maybe I’ve become a little spoiled.

    My god, Elena Anaya is stunning, achingly beautiful.

    Great interview David, thanks.

  9. movieman says:

    Does anyone else think that “Skin” is getting the short end of the stick this awards season?
    Almodovar is so dependably great, and so wildly prolific, that people (critics and audiences alike) have begun taking him for granted.
    Call it the “Woody Allen Curse.”

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DP/30

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“Any time a movie causes a country to threaten nuclear retaliation, the higher-ups wanna get in a room with you… In terms of getting the word out about the movie, it’s not bad. If they actually make good on it, it would be bad for the world—but luckily that doesn’t seem like their style… We’ll make a movie that maybe for two seconds will make some 18-year-old think about North Korea in a way he never would have otherwise. Or who knows? We were told one of the reasons they’re so against the movie is that they’re afraid it’ll actually get into North Korea. They do have bootlegs and stuff. Maybe the tapes will make their way to North Korea and cause a fucking revolution. At best, it will cause a country to be free, and at worst, it will cause a nuclear war. Big margin with this movie.”
~ Seth Rogen In Rolling Stone 1224

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies