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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya

SPOILER WARNING!!! We try not to talk about the surprises in the movie too much… but it’s impossible.

9 Responses to “DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya”

  1. jennab says:

    An EXCELLENT DP/30! Banderas is astonishingly thoughtful and articulate, with some sort of multiple for that charming accent. Anaya equally so. Movie sounds creepy as hell, but this interview may have persuaded me to see it. Well done! Did I miss the Almodovar interview, or is it coming?

  2. Bob Giovanelli says:

    I haven’t watched too many of your DP/30s, but if they’re as good as this was, I’ll keep watching. After seeing the film at the NY Film Festival press/industry screening this week, I was curious to see Antonio talk this afternoon at the Apple Store on the upper west side. Glad I watched this on a day I need to take a break from all things film festivals (combining a Hamptons Film Festival visit too this week with working NYFF)…as your interview with he and Elena was probably more entertaining than the crowded Apple Store will no doubt be in a half hour from now.

  3. Driver says:

    Broadway Bob?! Flip the block…

  4. Peter says:

    I don’t understand many critics consider The Skin I Live In as a lesser Pedro movie. If anything, it’s more entertaining and fun than most. It’s completely ludicrous, but so much fun to watch. No one can do melodrama better than Pedro.

  5. David Poland says:

    It’s a great movie. And the people who don’t enjoy it’s pleasures need the stick removed from their collective buttocks.

  6. Breedlove says:

    Almodovar is easily one of the ten best filmmakers in the world. I have a hard time picturing him making a bad movie, or even a mediocre one at this point.

  7. Krillian says:

    Kinda angry that the third act is what it is, because I read about a year ago what I thought was the basic plot; now I see it’s the Big Surprise of 2011.

  8. The Pope says:

    Sorry I’m not cheering from the gallery. I’m a big, big fan of Pedro and agree with Breedlove that he is one the ten best on the planet… but… I wasn’t involved in this one. Then again, he has been on such a searing run for the last 10 years, maybe I’ve become a little spoiled.

    My god, Elena Anaya is stunning, achingly beautiful.

    Great interview David, thanks.

  9. movieman says:

    Does anyone else think that “Skin” is getting the short end of the stick this awards season?
    Almodovar is so dependably great, and so wildly prolific, that people (critics and audiences alike) have begun taking him for granted.
    Call it the “Woody Allen Curse.”

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DP/30

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“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
~ George Miller

“I was having issues with my script for It’s All About Love, so I called Ingmar Bergman and we ended up talking about everything but the script. He said, “Well, Festen is a masterpiece, so what are you going to do now?” At that point, I had not decided if I was going to make It’s All About Love, so I answered, “Hmmm, I don’t know. Maybe this, maybe that.” There was just a long pause, and then he said, “You’re fucked.” I said, “Well, how can you know?” “Well, Thomas, you always have to decide your next movie before the movie you’re doing presently opens.” And I said, “Why is that?” “Well, two things can happen. One thing is that you fail, and then you’ll feel scared and humiliated. It’ll get into your head. Second, and even worse, you have success, and then you’ll want more of it, or you’ll want to maintain it. But if you decide on your next film while you’re in the middle of editing, it becomes a very nonchalant choice. And then it’s shorter from the heart to the hand.”
~ Thomas Vinterberg

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