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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya

SPOILER WARNING!!! We try not to talk about the surprises in the movie too much… but it’s impossible.

9 Responses to “DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya”

  1. jennab says:

    An EXCELLENT DP/30! Banderas is astonishingly thoughtful and articulate, with some sort of multiple for that charming accent. Anaya equally so. Movie sounds creepy as hell, but this interview may have persuaded me to see it. Well done! Did I miss the Almodovar interview, or is it coming?

  2. Bob Giovanelli says:

    I haven’t watched too many of your DP/30s, but if they’re as good as this was, I’ll keep watching. After seeing the film at the NY Film Festival press/industry screening this week, I was curious to see Antonio talk this afternoon at the Apple Store on the upper west side. Glad I watched this on a day I need to take a break from all things film festivals (combining a Hamptons Film Festival visit too this week with working NYFF)…as your interview with he and Elena was probably more entertaining than the crowded Apple Store will no doubt be in a half hour from now.

  3. Driver says:

    Broadway Bob?! Flip the block…

  4. Peter says:

    I don’t understand many critics consider The Skin I Live In as a lesser Pedro movie. If anything, it’s more entertaining and fun than most. It’s completely ludicrous, but so much fun to watch. No one can do melodrama better than Pedro.

  5. David Poland says:

    It’s a great movie. And the people who don’t enjoy it’s pleasures need the stick removed from their collective buttocks.

  6. Breedlove says:

    Almodovar is easily one of the ten best filmmakers in the world. I have a hard time picturing him making a bad movie, or even a mediocre one at this point.

  7. Krillian says:

    Kinda angry that the third act is what it is, because I read about a year ago what I thought was the basic plot; now I see it’s the Big Surprise of 2011.

  8. The Pope says:

    Sorry I’m not cheering from the gallery. I’m a big, big fan of Pedro and agree with Breedlove that he is one the ten best on the planet… but… I wasn’t involved in this one. Then again, he has been on such a searing run for the last 10 years, maybe I’ve become a little spoiled.

    My god, Elena Anaya is stunning, achingly beautiful.

    Great interview David, thanks.

  9. movieman says:

    Does anyone else think that “Skin” is getting the short end of the stick this awards season?
    Almodovar is so dependably great, and so wildly prolific, that people (critics and audiences alike) have begun taking him for granted.
    Call it the “Woody Allen Curse.”

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DP/30

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick