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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

And for those of you who’d like to see how time changes people over 10 months, the DP/30 from Sundance, with added guest star High Dancy

7 Responses to “DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin”

  1. LexG says:

    Would a LOOK AT HER be too predictable?

    Because, really…

    I cannot WAIT to see this movie.

  2. Gus says:

    Yeah I am beyond psyched. I got to get out to Pasadena to catch take shelter before this drops. I keel waiting for it to appear at the arc light and it never does.

    DP, was there ever a Lena Dunham DP30?

  3. berg says:

    M4 has one of the best endings of any film I’ve seen this year … before I saw the film I couldn’t correctly pronounce the title to save my life, now I can’t ever forget the title

  4. David Poland says:

    Gus… we were scheduled multiple times and it never quite worked out with her ever-changing schedule. I’m sure we’ll try again.

  5. Gus says:

    Thanks for the reply, I am interested in her arc since Tiny Furniture especially, though I know you don’t do many TV-centric DP/30s.

  6. SamLowry says:

    If I saw a trailer for this movie, the title alone would drive me screaming from the theater.

    Or am I the only one who thinks that sequence of words feels like a cheese grater on the brain?

  7. Ray Pride says:

    SamLowry, the words become a meaningful tattoo after you’ve seen the film. First saw at Sundance and thought same, but then saw it and… say no more.

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DP/30

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“To be a critic is to be a workaholic. Workaholism is socially conditioned: viewed favourably by exploiters, it’s generally ruinous to a worker’s mental health. When T.S. Eliot said criticism was as inevitable as breathing, he failed to mention that, respiratory problems notwithstanding, breathing is easy. Criticism is reflexive before reflective: to formalise/industrialise an involuntary instinct requires time, effort and discipline. The reason we seek remuneration, as opposed to the self-hatred of being a scab, is because all labour should be waged…

“Criticism, so the cliché by now goes, is dying. None of the panel discussions on its death agony, however—including those in which I’ve formally participated—come at it from the wider perspective that the problem surely needs. They defend the ways in which criticism functions in relation to the industry and to the public, but they fail to contextualise these relationships as defined by ultimately rotten and self-harming imperatives.

“Criticism was a noble profession so long as only a few could practice it for money; when the field expands, as it has with a so-called ‘democratisation’ of our practice, those few lose their political power. Competition grows and markets are undercut: publications are naturally going to start paying less. Precarity is both cause and effect of a surplus workforce: the reason you’re only as good as your last article is because there are plenty of other folks who can write the next one in your place. The daily grind is: pitch, or perish.

B”ut criticism, so a counter-cliché goes, is not dying. An irony: this is an elite sport that is no longer elite in terms of who is able to practice it, but in economic terms it’s clutching to a perverse and outmoded hierarchical structure. It’s more meritocratic than ever, now: which is to say it isn’t meritocratic at all. That’s a paradox in bad need of a resolution…”

~ Michael Pattison Manifestoes Film Criticism

“It’s easy to forget when you’re reading a critic every single week or multiple times a week, that most of us who do this job, and have been doing it for a long time, understand that this is basically a parasitic profession. I don’t mean in the sense that we’re evil bloodsucking creatures, but we couldn’t exist if we didn’t have something to analyze. And I’m always conscious of that. So whether I like or don’t like a particular thing you do, my point of view is always that of an appreciator. I just like to be in the world that you create.”
~ Matt Zoller Seitz To Sam Esmail

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