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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

And for those of you who’d like to see how time changes people over 10 months, the DP/30 from Sundance, with added guest star High Dancy

7 Responses to “DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin”

  1. LexG says:

    Would a LOOK AT HER be too predictable?

    Because, really…

    I cannot WAIT to see this movie.

  2. Gus says:

    Yeah I am beyond psyched. I got to get out to Pasadena to catch take shelter before this drops. I keel waiting for it to appear at the arc light and it never does.

    DP, was there ever a Lena Dunham DP30?

  3. berg says:

    M4 has one of the best endings of any film I’ve seen this year … before I saw the film I couldn’t correctly pronounce the title to save my life, now I can’t ever forget the title

  4. David Poland says:

    Gus… we were scheduled multiple times and it never quite worked out with her ever-changing schedule. I’m sure we’ll try again.

  5. Gus says:

    Thanks for the reply, I am interested in her arc since Tiny Furniture especially, though I know you don’t do many TV-centric DP/30s.

  6. SamLowry says:

    If I saw a trailer for this movie, the title alone would drive me screaming from the theater.

    Or am I the only one who thinks that sequence of words feels like a cheese grater on the brain?

  7. Ray Pride says:

    SamLowry, the words become a meaningful tattoo after you’ve seen the film. First saw at Sundance and thought same, but then saw it and… say no more.

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DP/30

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“Let me put this bluntly, in language even a busy blogger can understand: Criticism — and its humble cousin, reviewing — is not a democratic activity. It is, or should be, an elite enterprise, ideally undertaken by individuals who bring something to the party beyond their hasty, instinctive opinions of a book (or any other cultural object). It is work that requires disciplined taste, historical and theoretical knowledge and a fairly deep sense of the author’s (or filmmaker’s or painter’s) entire body of work, among other qualities.”
~ Richard Schickel

“When Barry Jenkins introduced Moonlight, he said he hoped we see ourselves in the characters. We’re thrown into neighborhood combat with 10-year-old Chiron in Miami’s Liberty City where the empty lots, abandoned buildings, sidewalks — the shortcuts and escape routes — are his total known world. We intake vividly, like a 10-year-old, the cruel, the generous, the strangeness of others, the crack-addled neglect in a home he can’t escape. Jenkins’ characters’ lives move on, get stunted, are dulled to stupefaction, end tragically, end in separation. Moonlight is Chiron’s world. It’s the current lower-middle class, working class, disenfranchised- and-alienated-class world. Intimacy is Jenkins’ accomplishment. But, what we’re intimate with is another consciousness so totally and truthfully created, that we’re looking outward and inward simultaneously. That’s why Jenkins’ work is profound. Chiron is us and we are him, asking ourselves, ‘Who am I? Where do I fit?'”
~ Michael Mann On Moonlight