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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

And for those of you who’d like to see how time changes people over 10 months, the DP/30 from Sundance, with added guest star High Dancy

7 Responses to “DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin”

  1. LexG says:

    Would a LOOK AT HER be too predictable?

    Because, really…

    I cannot WAIT to see this movie.

  2. Gus says:

    Yeah I am beyond psyched. I got to get out to Pasadena to catch take shelter before this drops. I keel waiting for it to appear at the arc light and it never does.

    DP, was there ever a Lena Dunham DP30?

  3. berg says:

    M4 has one of the best endings of any film I’ve seen this year … before I saw the film I couldn’t correctly pronounce the title to save my life, now I can’t ever forget the title

  4. David Poland says:

    Gus… we were scheduled multiple times and it never quite worked out with her ever-changing schedule. I’m sure we’ll try again.

  5. Gus says:

    Thanks for the reply, I am interested in her arc since Tiny Furniture especially, though I know you don’t do many TV-centric DP/30s.

  6. SamLowry says:

    If I saw a trailer for this movie, the title alone would drive me screaming from the theater.

    Or am I the only one who thinks that sequence of words feels like a cheese grater on the brain?

  7. Ray Pride says:

    SamLowry, the words become a meaningful tattoo after you’ve seen the film. First saw at Sundance and thought same, but then saw it and… say no more.

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DP/30

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick