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DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

And for those of you who’d like to see how time changes people over 10 months, the DP/30 from Sundance, with added guest star High Dancy

7 Responses to “DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin”

  1. LexG says:

    Would a LOOK AT HER be too predictable?

    Because, really…

    I cannot WAIT to see this movie.

  2. Gus says:

    Yeah I am beyond psyched. I got to get out to Pasadena to catch take shelter before this drops. I keel waiting for it to appear at the arc light and it never does.

    DP, was there ever a Lena Dunham DP30?

  3. berg says:

    M4 has one of the best endings of any film I’ve seen this year … before I saw the film I couldn’t correctly pronounce the title to save my life, now I can’t ever forget the title

  4. David Poland says:

    Gus… we were scheduled multiple times and it never quite worked out with her ever-changing schedule. I’m sure we’ll try again.

  5. Gus says:

    Thanks for the reply, I am interested in her arc since Tiny Furniture especially, though I know you don’t do many TV-centric DP/30s.

  6. SamLowry says:

    If I saw a trailer for this movie, the title alone would drive me screaming from the theater.

    Or am I the only one who thinks that sequence of words feels like a cheese grater on the brain?

  7. Ray Pride says:

    SamLowry, the words become a meaningful tattoo after you’ve seen the film. First saw at Sundance and thought same, but then saw it and… say no more.

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“People used to love to call me a maverick, because I had a big mouth, and I’d say, ‘That bum!’ or something like that when I was young. Mainly, because I believed it, and I didn’t know there was anybody’s pain connected to the business. I was so young, I didn’t feel any pain. I just thought, ‘Why don’t they do some exciting, venturesome things? Why are they just sitting there, doing these dull pictures that have already been done many, many times, and calling them exciting? That’s a lie — they’re not exciting. Exciting is an experiment… That reputation keeps with you, through the years. Once the press calls you a maverick, it stays in their files. I’ll be dead five years, and they’ll still be saying, ‘That maverick son-of-a-bitch, he’s off in Colorado, making a movie.’ As if they really cared. You know, in this business, it’s all jealousy. I mean, this is the dumbest business I’ve ever seen in my life. If somebody gets married, they say, ‘It’ll never work.’ If somebody gets divorced, they say, ‘Good. I’ll give you my lawyer.’ If somebody loses a job, everyone will call him — to gloat. They’ll discuss it, they’ll be happy, they’ll have parties. I don’t understand how people that can see each other all the time, and be friends, can be so happy about each other’s demise.”
~ John Cassavetes


“There’s a culture of friendship in Latin American cinema, between people like Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro, which they in turn inherited from others. They’re a sensation of brotherhood, that people care abut you, look after you, which we’ve sought to maintain consciously. That ‘brotherhood’ is the best way to survive, to make better films, but it also a way of coming close to the biggest reason to make films. Filmmaking for me is like a fraternal act, like being with your family, and feeling that what we’re doing, when the film is over and makes some impact, is worth it. That intense encounter with all those people flowers, emanates for ever. You’re a kind of cousin, brother, lover, father, son of all those people with whom you worked. It’s a beautiful sensation.”
Gael García Bernal


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