MCN Columnists
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

20W20: Best Picture Chart, Oct 23, 2011

10/23/11 Charts
Picture | Actor | Supporting Actor | Actress | Supporting Actress

BEST
PICTURE
Date
Picture
Studio
Director
Stars
The
Nomination Frontrunners (seen)
Open

Midnight in Paris

SPC
Allen
Wilson
Nov 23 The Artist
TWC
Hazanavicius
Dujardin
Bejo
Nov 18

The Descendants

FxSrch
Payne
Clooney
Woodley
The
Mystery Movies
Dec 28

War Horse

DW/Dis
Spielberg
Irvine
Arestrup
Nov 11

J Edgar

WB
Eastwood
DiCaprio
Dench
Hammer
Dec 21

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

Sony
Fincher

Mara
Craig

Dec 25

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

WB
Daldry

Bullock
Hanks
Von Sydow

Dec
23

We Bought A Zoo

Fox
Crowe
Johansson
Damon
Fanning
Dec 16

The Iron Lady

TWC
Lloyd
Streep
The
Upper Middle Class
Open The Help
DW/Dis
Taylor

Davis
Spencer
Chastain
Howard

Dec 9

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Focus
Alfredson
Oldman
Dec 2

Shame

FxSrch
McQueen
Mulligan
Fassbender
Dec 9

Young Adult

Par
Reitman
Theron
Oswalt
Open

The Tree of Life

FxSrch
Malick
Pitt
Chastain
Open

Moneyball

Sony
Miller

Pitt
Hill

Open

The Ides of March

Sony
Clooney

Gosling

The
Longshots
Nov 23

A Dangerous Method

SPC
Cronenberg

Knightley
Mortensen
Fassbender

Dec 23
Albert Nobbs
Road
Garcia
Close
McTeer
Dec 23

Tintin

Par/DW
Spielberg
Nov 23

Hugo

Par
Scorsese
Open

Take Shelter

SPC
Nichols

Shannon

Chastain

Dec 2

The Lady

Cohen
Besson
Yeoh
Oct 28
Anonymous
Sony
Emmerich
Ifans
Redgrave
Nov 18

Carnage

SPC
Polanski
Winslet
unknown
Rampart
Millenium
Moverman
Harrelson

3 Responses to “20W20: Best Picture Chart, Oct 23, 2011”

  1. Michael says:

    No “Artist” on the Best Picture list?

  2. eric n says:

    No “The Help”…even as a long shot?

    I know box office isn’t everything, but it made more than the combination of any two of these movies…and a higher RT than Blind Side…and it’s socially conscience.

  3. movielocke says:

    No Artist or The Help? Wow.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Well, actually, of that whole group that I call the post-60s anti-authority auteurs, a lot of them came from television. Peckinpah’s the only one whose television work represents his feature work. I mean, like the only one. Mark Rydell can direct a really good episode of ‘Gunsmoke’ and Michael Ritchie can direct a really good episode of ‘The Big Valley,’ but they don’t necessarily look like The Candidate. But Peckinpah’s stuff, even the scripts he wrote that he didn’t even direct, have a Peckinpah feel – the way I think there’s a Corbucci West – suggest a Peckinpah West. That even in his random episodes that he wrote for ‘Gunsmoke’ – it’s right there.”
~ Quentin Tarantino

“The thought is interrupted by an odd interlude. We are speaking in the side room of Casita, a swish and fairly busy Italian bistro in Aoyama – a district of Tokyo usually so replete with celebrities that they spark minimal fuss. Kojima’s fame, however, exceeds normal limits and adoring staff have worked out who their guest is. He stops mid-sentence and points up towards the speakers, delighted. The soft jazz that had been playing discreetly across the restaurant’s dark, hardwood interior has suddenly been replaced with the theme music from some of Kojima’s hit games. Harry Gregson-Williams’ music is sublime in its context but ‘Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots’ is not, Kojima acknowledges, terribly restauranty. He pauses, adjusting a pair of large, blue-framed glasses of his own design, and returns to the way in which games have not only influenced films, but have also changed the way in which people watch them. “There are stories being told [in cinema] that my generation may find surprising but which the gamer generation doesn’t find weird at all,” he says.
~ Hideo Kojima