MCN Columnists
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

19 Weeks To Oscar (20W2O) Charts: October 23, 2011

10/30/11 Charts
Picture | Animated Feature

BEST
ANIMATED FEATURE
Picture
Studio
Comment
The
Nomination Frontrunners (seen)

Rango

Par

The Adventures Of Tintin

Par/Sony
If qualified as animation
Happy Feet Two
WB

Kung Fu Pands 2

Sony

Rio

Fox

Arthur Christmas

Sony

Puss In Boots

DWA

Cars 2

Pixar

Hoodwinked Too!

TWC

Gnomeo & Juliet

BV
Winnie The Pooh
Dis

Mars Needs Moms

Dis
Unlikely To Be Qualified, But Released Theatrically This Year

Evangelion 2.0: You Are (Not) Alone

11Arts

Trigun: Badlands Rumble

11Arts

The Greatest Miracle

KKM

MIa and the Migoo

GK

One Response to “19 Weeks To Oscar (20W2O) Charts: October 23, 2011”

  1. movielocke says:

    I’m trying to figure out the logic of a disney or pixar film not being nominated when it is academy animators (mostly employed by disney and pixar) making the nominations… Are you suggesting an incredibly unheard of phenomenon wherein people don’t vote for themselves? What motivates this altruistic miracle? A religious belief in Art (a belief that many profess but has never yet canceled out self-serving interests)?

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Well, actually, of that whole group that I call the post-60s anti-authority auteurs, a lot of them came from television. Peckinpah’s the only one whose television work represents his feature work. I mean, like the only one. Mark Rydell can direct a really good episode of ‘Gunsmoke’ and Michael Ritchie can direct a really good episode of ‘The Big Valley,’ but they don’t necessarily look like The Candidate. But Peckinpah’s stuff, even the scripts he wrote that he didn’t even direct, have a Peckinpah feel – the way I think there’s a Corbucci West – suggest a Peckinpah West. That even in his random episodes that he wrote for ‘Gunsmoke’ – it’s right there.”
~ Quentin Tarantino

“The thought is interrupted by an odd interlude. We are speaking in the side room of Casita, a swish and fairly busy Italian bistro in Aoyama – a district of Tokyo usually so replete with celebrities that they spark minimal fuss. Kojima’s fame, however, exceeds normal limits and adoring staff have worked out who their guest is. He stops mid-sentence and points up towards the speakers, delighted. The soft jazz that had been playing discreetly across the restaurant’s dark, hardwood interior has suddenly been replaced with the theme music from some of Kojima’s hit games. Harry Gregson-Williams’ music is sublime in its context but ‘Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots’ is not, Kojima acknowledges, terribly restauranty. He pauses, adjusting a pair of large, blue-framed glasses of his own design, and returns to the way in which games have not only influenced films, but have also changed the way in which people watch them. “There are stories being told [in cinema] that my generation may find surprising but which the gamer generation doesn’t find weird at all,” he says.
~ Hideo Kojima