Night Moves
MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Trailer: Takashi Miike’s Ninja Kids!!!

4 Responses to “Trailer: Takashi Miike’s Ninja Kids!!!”

  1. Don R. Lewis says:

    WTFffffffff. That looks like a Shaw Bros movie directed by Robert Rodriguez. Or Cronenberg’s THE BROOD re-imagined by Miike. Dude’s some kind of mad scientist (Miike that is).

  2. J says:

    In an interview included on the DVD, Miike described ’13 Assassins’ as “a family film.” I look forward to his description of this one.

  3. Tofu says:

    Knowing Miike, this will play straight as a kids film for 70 minutes, and then the last 10 will be an uncomfortable mature turn filled with sadism & death.

    Even The Great Yokai War started out a bit freaky and Yatterman had some S&M vibes, just from the source material.

  4. krazyeyes says:

    I’ve always found Miike to be a (mostly) complete hack with only 1 or 2 good films to his filmography. Robert Rodriquez is a perfect analogy.

    He’s a prime example of fanboys putting junk on a pedestal just because it’s from someplace exotic. If this shit was from Hollywood people would be giving it as much attention as Bob Clark’s Baby Geniuses.

Leave a Reply

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver