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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

That 9-Minute GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO Trailer


Glistening, gorgeous: the crystalline light in the nine-minute trailer for David Fincher‘s Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was the consistent aspect that kept me gawping after Wednesday night’s Chicago all-media of Straw Dogs. And Lisbeth Salander’s “FUCK YOU FUCKING FUCK” t-shirt, sported as soiled sleepwear is as immediately iconic as the stray cardboard carton with an IKEA logo. Whatever combination of digital formats Fincher and cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth are wielding, hurrah. Swedish eggshell-to-matte-gray light allows color and dimension to pop in almost every image in the product reel. (There’s a gray-black-orange-pale red sunset over a vista of Stockholm’s Soldermalm neighborhood like part of a slow dusk that would take hours to fall.) While it’s intended to introduce audiences who know neither Stieg Larsson‘s three books or the Swedish trilogy to the teeming dramatis personae, it’s comforting in a different way if you know the material: ah, this. Ah, that. (Unembarrassed grin in half-darkness.) A detail-fixated film director takes on a surly Aspergian protagonist with ample, similar skills? Ah, that. Here’s a streaming 7’26” of Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross‘ score. Twitter account @mouthtapedshut solicited those with a free Thursday evening in seventeen cities to retweet for the chance to be invited to…most  likely a sneak of Straw Dogs brandishing the same nine minutes. [Images via the film’s “viral” Tumblr MTS.]

2 Responses to “That 9-Minute GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO Trailer”

  1. M. A. Neofitou says:

    Is a nine minute trailer engaging or simply sloppy editing?

  2. Ray Pride says:

    It introduces the characters and gives a sense of the chilly style. Call it a “featurette,” like Hitchcock’s long promo for Psycho.

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“I’m an ardent consumer of Fassbinder. Years ago, when I heard that he was a big admirer of Douglas Sirk, I went straight to the source — to the buffet Fassbinder dined out on — and found that there was plenty more. And what palettes! I love the look of Fassbinder movies. Some of them are also hideous in a way that’s really exciting. When you go to Sirk, it’s more standardized. The movies produced by Ross Hunter — those really lush, Technicolor ones. I know Sirk was a painter and considered himself a painter first for a long time. He really knew how to work his palettes and worked closely with whatever art director he had. I was a guest speaker for the Technicolor series at TIFF Bell Lightbox and we screened Magnificent Obsession. To prepare for that, I watched the movie with a pen and paper. I wroteto down the names of the palettes. Soon, I realized those general color terms weren’t good enough. I used to be a house painter and I remembered the great names of the 10,000 different colors you could get in a paint chip book. So, I started to try to name the colors. Sirk used 100 different off-whites, especially in the surgery scenes in Magnificent Obsession!”
~ Guy Maddin On Sirk And Fassbinder

“I’ve never been lumped in with other female directors. If anything, I’ve been compared way too much to male filmmakers whom I have little to nothing in common with except visual style. It’s true that women’s filmmaking is incredibly diverse, but I am personally interested in how female consciousness might shape artwork differently, especially in the way female characters are constructed. So I actually would encourage people to try to group women’s films together to see if there are any threads that connect them, and to try to create a sort of canon of women’s films that critics can talk about as women’s films. One reason I want to be thought of as a female filmmaker is that my work can only be understood in that context. So many critics want to see my work as a pastiche of films that men have created. When they do that, they deny the fact that I am creating my own world, something completely original. Women are so often thought of as being unable to make meaning. So they are allowed to copy what men make—to make a pastiche out of what men have created—but not to create original work. My work comes from a place of being female, and rewrites film genres from that place. So it’s essential for me to be placed into a history of female-feminist art-making practice, otherwise it’s taking the work completely out of context.”
~ Love Witch Writer-Designer-Director Anna Biller