By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Prodigy PR Adds Zach Rosenfield

Agency expands PR offerings to include TV and Sports division

Los Angeles, September 22, 2011 – Publicity veteran Zach Rosenfield has joined entertainment PR and marketing firm Prodigy Public Relations as Executive VP, Television and Sports Entertainment. He will work closely with Prodigy’s President & CEO Erik Bright, who Rosenfield previously served alongside as principal partner at Insignia PR and Media Strategies.  Bright co-founded Prodigy PR in 2009 with former distribution/publicity executive and Prodigy’s Chief Operating Officer Alex Klenert.

Rosenfield’s focus will be on the expansion of the company’s growing TV presence through representation of scripted and non-scripted material, writer/executive producers, series show runners, and physical production.  He has an extensive background in television and over the years has represented Josh Schwartz and Shonda Rhymes, Endemol Entertainment, Big Brother, Fear Factor, Paula Abdul, Tom Green, television host Kennedy, among many others.

For the Sports Entertainment Division, Rosenfield will leverage the relationships he made during his time with AccuScore, the leading sports statistical information company, to establish media strategies and representation for athletes, companies, organizations, brands and events.  Additionally, he will seek out sports films that need publicity exposure with sports press that goes beyond the traditional movie campaign coverage.

Over the last four years, Rosenfield oversaw AccuScore’s day-to-day website business while also serving as company spokesperson with sports information reports for interviews on ESPN Radio. While at AccuScore, Rosenfield brokered editorial partnerships with Yahoo!, ESPN, Wall Street Journal and Sporting News, and created numerous local market content integrations for AccuScore on television, radio, print and new media platforms.

Rosenfield previously served as the Head of Entertainment at Fifteen Minutes Public Relations and was a Principal at Insignia Public Relations and Media Strategies, where he worked with Bright from 2001 to 2006.

Bright commented, “It is great to be working with Zach again whose wealth of experience will be a tremendous asset to our company. He is one of the most talented media strategists I have worked with and in bringing him on board, it signals Prodigy’s expansion into all aspects of the entertainment industry.”

“I am thrilled to work again with Erik and am here to take the solid foundation that Prodigy PR has built and grow the company to cover television and sports,” says Rosenfield.  “The convergence of sports and entertainment is ever-present in our society today and I want to offer our clients and partners the best PR services to play in both arenas.”

Prodigy PR recently was at the Toronto Film Festival representing “Hysteria” starring Maggie Gyllenhaal, Frederick Wiseman’s “Crazy Horse,” and Nick Broomfield’s “Sarah Palin: You Betcha!” which is scheduled to be in theaters on September 30th.  Other upcoming theatrical campaigns include “The Double” on October 28th with Richard Gere, Topher Grace, and Stephen Moyer; Nick Hamm’s “Killing Bono” on November 4th with Ben Barnes, Krysten Ritter, and the late Pete Postlethwaite; and Alex Stapleton’s “Corman’s World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel” on December 16th.

ABOUT PRODIGY PR

Prodigy PR focuses on representation of independent production and financing companies; production and release campaigns for film, DVD, VOD, and television projects; film festival and market strategies; awards strategies; premieres and events; and corporate communications for companies that seek a presence in the entertainment business and financial media. Company founders – President & CEO Erik Bright and Chief Operating Officer Alex Klenert – form a unique pairing of a veteran agency media strategist and an experienced indie distribution publicity executive to offer services that exceed traditional publicity planning.  Prodigy PR’s publicity and marketing teams develop and execute campaigns and corporate strategies that include film acquisition announcements and unit publicity, film festival coordination, and targeted audience strategies and major media outreach for film distribution.  For more information, please visit our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/prodigypr or our corporate website at http://www.prodigypublicrelations.com.

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

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~ David Lynch