By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Prodigy PR Adds Zach Rosenfield

Agency expands PR offerings to include TV and Sports division

Los Angeles, September 22, 2011 – Publicity veteran Zach Rosenfield has joined entertainment PR and marketing firm Prodigy Public Relations as Executive VP, Television and Sports Entertainment. He will work closely with Prodigy’s President & CEO Erik Bright, who Rosenfield previously served alongside as principal partner at Insignia PR and Media Strategies.  Bright co-founded Prodigy PR in 2009 with former distribution/publicity executive and Prodigy’s Chief Operating Officer Alex Klenert.

Rosenfield’s focus will be on the expansion of the company’s growing TV presence through representation of scripted and non-scripted material, writer/executive producers, series show runners, and physical production.  He has an extensive background in television and over the years has represented Josh Schwartz and Shonda Rhymes, Endemol Entertainment, Big Brother, Fear Factor, Paula Abdul, Tom Green, television host Kennedy, among many others.

For the Sports Entertainment Division, Rosenfield will leverage the relationships he made during his time with AccuScore, the leading sports statistical information company, to establish media strategies and representation for athletes, companies, organizations, brands and events.  Additionally, he will seek out sports films that need publicity exposure with sports press that goes beyond the traditional movie campaign coverage.

Over the last four years, Rosenfield oversaw AccuScore’s day-to-day website business while also serving as company spokesperson with sports information reports for interviews on ESPN Radio. While at AccuScore, Rosenfield brokered editorial partnerships with Yahoo!, ESPN, Wall Street Journal and Sporting News, and created numerous local market content integrations for AccuScore on television, radio, print and new media platforms.

Rosenfield previously served as the Head of Entertainment at Fifteen Minutes Public Relations and was a Principal at Insignia Public Relations and Media Strategies, where he worked with Bright from 2001 to 2006.

Bright commented, “It is great to be working with Zach again whose wealth of experience will be a tremendous asset to our company. He is one of the most talented media strategists I have worked with and in bringing him on board, it signals Prodigy’s expansion into all aspects of the entertainment industry.”

“I am thrilled to work again with Erik and am here to take the solid foundation that Prodigy PR has built and grow the company to cover television and sports,” says Rosenfield.  “The convergence of sports and entertainment is ever-present in our society today and I want to offer our clients and partners the best PR services to play in both arenas.”

Prodigy PR recently was at the Toronto Film Festival representing “Hysteria” starring Maggie Gyllenhaal, Frederick Wiseman’s “Crazy Horse,” and Nick Broomfield’s “Sarah Palin: You Betcha!” which is scheduled to be in theaters on September 30th.  Other upcoming theatrical campaigns include “The Double” on October 28th with Richard Gere, Topher Grace, and Stephen Moyer; Nick Hamm’s “Killing Bono” on November 4th with Ben Barnes, Krysten Ritter, and the late Pete Postlethwaite; and Alex Stapleton’s “Corman’s World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel” on December 16th.

ABOUT PRODIGY PR

Prodigy PR focuses on representation of independent production and financing companies; production and release campaigns for film, DVD, VOD, and television projects; film festival and market strategies; awards strategies; premieres and events; and corporate communications for companies that seek a presence in the entertainment business and financial media. Company founders – President & CEO Erik Bright and Chief Operating Officer Alex Klenert – form a unique pairing of a veteran agency media strategist and an experienced indie distribution publicity executive to offer services that exceed traditional publicity planning.  Prodigy PR’s publicity and marketing teams develop and execute campaigns and corporate strategies that include film acquisition announcements and unit publicity, film festival coordination, and targeted audience strategies and major media outreach for film distribution.  For more information, please visit our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/prodigypr or our corporate website at http://www.prodigypublicrelations.com.

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MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2