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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Melancholia, actors Alexander Skarsgard, Kiefer Sutherland

10 Responses to “DP/30: Melancholia, actors Alexander Skarsgard, Kiefer Sutherland”

  1. Joe says:

    Thank you for this.

  2. LexG says:

    AWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWESOME.

    Two GODS. Also, not that you guys weren’t gonna see it anyway, but you will BOW to MELANCHOLIA when it comes out… I know it’s hitting VOD first, but I think it’s a bad move because it TOTALLY deserves the full theater treatment with killer sound.

    Masterpiece. Dunst and Gainsbourg absolutely should be nominated.

  3. ThriceDamned says:

    /signed

    Top 5 this year for sure on my list. The film just filled me with an incredible sense of existential dread, if you will, that I’m not sure I’ve ever really felt before to that extent. Just incredible filmmaking and acting across the board.

    Great DP/30…Kiefer has a real presence and gravitas as he gets older. His voice is getting more gravelly, really works for him.

  4. Kelly Griffin Sherwood says:

    Thank you! I look forward to viewing the movie. 8)

  5. DiscoNap says:

    Kiefer would be a great Big Bad for the next (hopefully last?) season of True Blood. Be a nice callback to his Lost Boys breakthrough.

  6. Anna says:

    Love this interview, thank you for posting. I agree with the comment about Kiefer having a real presence and gravitas as he gets older, I think he has really grown into himself as a person and an actor and this interview makes me even more excited to watch for him the future. And Skarsgard is a huge up and coming star – I only hope he doesn’t lose himself in the process as is so easy to do in Hollywood. Can’t wait to see Melancholia.

  7. Guntra says:

    I’m about to watch Melancholia, in a few min… was looking forward to it all summer long (ever since Cannes). this interview makes me even more excited to finally see it, even though I am guessing it’s going to be a heavy watch, just like his other movies are.
    depression per se (becoming more and more sad, desperate and cynical…) is smth I can unfortunately relate to; I am always looking for answers and ways how others are coping with it… rather than just (choosing to) going down.

  8. Guntra says:

    so… I watched it.
    I really feared it will be smth like Antichrist – but it wasn’t. that doesn’t mean it was less hard to watch, haha.

    what a beautiful, beautiful insight into a depressive’s mind… and the lives of those around them. so tortuously real.

  9. sanj says:

    standard dvd commentary – i doubt we’ll see these actors again in at least a year ..

    i really wanted Sutherland to throw the water bottle at DP and do some Jack Baurer stuff .

  10. Mishell says:

    Here’s another take on the movie:
    Melancholia: Lars Von Trier’s “Bleak” House
    http://culturecatch.com/film/melancholia

DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch