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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Higher Ground, director/actor Vera Farmiga, actor Joshua Leonard

2 Responses to “DP/30: Higher Ground, director/actor Vera Farmiga, actor Joshua Leonard”

  1. Gus says:

    Drove 45 minutes to see this movie a few days ago and found it remarkable. Extremely insightful, adult, complex, and ambiguous take on what it is like to live a life of faith. Even rarer to see a film like this done without a mocking tone.

    People say independent film is dead, but there are films every year that remind me that there are always going to be filmmakers making pictures that are not afraid to appeal to people willing to think about what they’re seeing.

    This is a movie worth wrestling with, even though it’s not overly self-serious or belabored. Performances are terrific and a number of the bit players really nail their scenes – I’m especially thinking of the ‘McMuffin’ scene. Great work.

  2. Rob says:

    She’s an incredible talent, can’t wait to see this when it opens here Friday.

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DP/30

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver