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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30: Higher Ground, director/actor Vera Farmiga, actor Joshua Leonard

2 Responses to “DP/30: Higher Ground, director/actor Vera Farmiga, actor Joshua Leonard”

  1. Gus says:

    Drove 45 minutes to see this movie a few days ago and found it remarkable. Extremely insightful, adult, complex, and ambiguous take on what it is like to live a life of faith. Even rarer to see a film like this done without a mocking tone.

    People say independent film is dead, but there are films every year that remind me that there are always going to be filmmakers making pictures that are not afraid to appeal to people willing to think about what they’re seeing.

    This is a movie worth wrestling with, even though it’s not overly self-serious or belabored. Performances are terrific and a number of the bit players really nail their scenes – I’m especially thinking of the ‘McMuffin’ scene. Great work.

  2. Rob says:

    She’s an incredible talent, can’t wait to see this when it opens here Friday.

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman