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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

The Campaign for The Lady Launches

9 Responses to “The Campaign for The Lady Launches”

  1. LexG says:

    I don’t get why the MIGHTY Luc Besson is doing this of all things… Seems like a PURE medicine movie, won’t make much money, and it’s been proven time and again that Americans don’t care about these epic Eastern humanitarian movies (Kundun, Beyond Rangoon, Anna and the King, Red Corner)… Come to think of it, wasn’t Boorman’s Beyond Rangoon ALSO about the EXACT same story– ONG SONG SUCHEE or whatever her name was? Other than some dippy Westside Yogi, does anyone in America have interest in this material? Starring a 50-year-old Asian actress? Good luck.

    I want the old Luc Besson back; I go to Luc Besson movies to see lanky, anorexic, slightly boyish supermodels in fetish wear shooting off oversized guns… I don’t care about ONG SONG SUCHEE.

  2. Joe Leydon says:

    Oddly enough, both posters look like Hatch Show Prints.

  3. sloanish says:

    I know it’s subjective and they’re both wonderful, but is this the first time where you could argue that the actor is less attractive than the subject?

  4. LexG says:

    they should of had her played by jennifer morrison

  5. cadavra says:

    You guys do realize that Yeoh is drop-dead gorgeous and that’s MAKEUP!!!!!!!

  6. Edward Wilson says:

    Luc Besson’s Pearl Harbor.

  7. palmtree says:

    Luc Besson is making Oscar bait, right?

  8. yancyskancy says:

    Lex, don’t worry – COLOMBIANA is on the way (even though Besson isn’t in the director’s chair).

    I think it’s cool that Yeoh is getting an Oscar bait role; hope it’s good.

  9. LexG says:

    COLOMBIANA POWER MEGATON POWER SALDANA POWER VARTAN POWER MOLLA POWER.

    If you’re not going to see COLOMBIANA SIXTEEN TIMES this weekend, you should be banned from movies.

    Only thing is, why is it PG-13? Aw fuck it, getting kinda sick of that whole AICN thing where dorks get all HOSTILE if something isn’t HARD R. Who cares, what’s more awesome, hot chicks and guns, or a bunch of explicit squib shots?

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