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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Super Amazing HOT MIley Cyrus Sex Tape Trailer – Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengence

SEO SUCKS!

But this trailer… it actually looks like it could be the rare comic book movie that really gets it… is that possible?

19 Responses to “Super Amazing HOT MIley Cyrus Sex Tape Trailer – Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengence”

  1. anon says:

    wth? i see no sex tape..

  2. JoeLeydon'sPersonalPornStar says:

    Oh David, your superior SEO sucked me in! But I still could care less about comic book movies.

  3. JoeLeydon'sPersonalPornStar says:

    Or, actually, could NOT care less. (Dang that need for real grammar!)

  4. anghus says:

    probably the best marriage between creators and material in the current crop of comic book movies.

    Easily as good as Joe Johnston and Captain America and Nolan/Batman. Ghost Rider is pulp. They got the pulpiest guys in the business. Rock on. My film cock is hard.

  5. sloanish says:

    I really, really hate those guys. And I really hate that I’m in the minority on that.

    As the Cranks come full circle and become looked at as trash art, we all lose.

  6. JKill says:

    I’m mixed on Neveldine/Taylor because I love the two CRANKs but despise GAMER, which is such an ugly, mean-spirited nihilistic celebration…but

    I have to say that trailer worked perfectly on me. The look of the movie and the action is seriously cool. The first GR is defintely towards the bottom quality-wise of the current super hero movies, but Cage is really fun, funny and awesome in it, so I’m glad they’re giving the character another spin. Looks fun.

  7. Chris says:

    Is Nic Cage really gonna pee fire on people in this movie? Cause I may be mistaken, but I’m pretty sure that’s fairly high up on the cinematic must see list. I’m not a fan of Crank, but I dig what they were going for, and this looks like a great match between filmmakers and source material. Bring on some more Cage mega-acting!

  8. 16666 says:

    Am I the only one who liked the first Ghost Rider movie? I’m not saying it was great art, but I think it achieved what it set out to do – entertain. The villain and the girl character were rather blah, but I enjoyed the effects, and Nic Cage and Peter Fonda in the same movie – come on! I was surprised by all the hate and yet it did well enough financially to warrant a sequel.

  9. Pete B. says:

    You’re not the only one to like the 1st, 16666. I enjoyed it as well. The extended (or Special Edition) was even better as it fleshed out (no pun intended) the secondary bad guys.

  10. Martin says:

    I’m not a comic book fum but I like this. Dark, violent, cheesy, and crazy, I like it.

  11. LYT says:

    I liked the first Ghost Rider, but understand why people don’t as it took a gothic, horrific character and made him an over-the-top Nicolas Cage, something I just happen to enjoy.

    Still waiting for a good Bad Lieutenant/Ghost Rider mashup, what with Mendes and Cage starring in both.

    sloanish – I don’t think you’re in the minority disliking N/T, given that none of their movies ever screen for critics. Maybe just the minority here.

  12. storymark says:

    “Gets” what, exactly? And is it really that rare for a comic film to get “it”?

  13. sloaner says:

    LYT – Hearing someone like Patton Oswalt cheer those guys on chills my soul.

  14. LexG says:

    I don’t get the “Miley” thing?

    Where is she?

  15. Foamy Squirrel says:

    You can’t see her? It’s totally obvious to me, and she’s showing her feet too…

  16. LexG says:

    Finally somebody with a sense of humor on here

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DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
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DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
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~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato