By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

GOVERNOR QUINN PROCLAIMS AUGUST 19 “MARTIN SHEEN AND EMILIO ESTEVEZ DAY”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CHICAGO – Martin Sheen will go home with more than just the Silver Hugo for Career Achievement when he visits Chicago this August for the Chicago International Film Festival’s Annual Summer Gala.  Governor Quinn has announced that he will honor the legendary actor and his son by proclaiming August 19th, “Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez Day” in the state of Illinois.  The Governor will be on hand at the Gala to make the official proclamation, which will be followed by a special screening of Sheen’s latest film The Way, directed by son, Emilio Estevez.

Illinois’ outstanding creative community is just one of the many reasons the Chicago International Film Festival is a great success year after year,” Governor Quinn said. “In recognition of their many contributions to the arts and other charitable causes, I hereby proclaim Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez Day in Illinois and welcome their continued support of our state’s film industry.”

The Summer Gala honoring Martin Sheen with special guest Emilio Estevez will be held at AMC River East (322 E. Illinois St.) with reception following at The Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers. The evening will feature the Chicago Premiere of The Way, and will be followed by an intimate discussion with the legendary father and son duo.

Vivian Teng, Managing Director of Cinema/Chicago highlights the importance of this fundraiser: “Proceeds from this event supports our year-round Educational Outreach program, a program that brings filmmakers and their films to thousands of inner-city students, including the deaf and hard of hearing, and fosters media literacy. It will also help make possible the 47th Chicago International Film Festival, October 6-20, 2011.”

Cinema/Chicago, the presenter of the Chicago International Film Festival, is a not-for-profit cultural and education organization dedicated to fostering better understanding between cultures and to making a positive contribution to the art form of the moving image.

The Summer Gala is presented by Cinema/Chicago and the Chicago International Film Festival, American Airlines, Lincoln, and Tribeca Flashpoint Media Arts Academy. Evening partners include: Park Hyatt Chicago, Grey Goose, CS, Today’s Chicago Woman, and TimeOut Chicago.

Tickets for the Summer Gala are on sale NOW! For event and ticket information visit:
www.chicagofilmfestival.com.

Leave a Reply

Quote Unquotesee all »

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2

“I wanted to make you love a murderer. There’s no way of redeeming him. He’s a drunk and a killer. He killed at least seven people (that we know of). But there were reasons he was a bad guy. He was surrounded by evil in those days. A lot of people were killed building modern Florida—modern everywhere. Watson had plenty of opportunities to see how rough those guys were playing and he thought he could do it too. At least he rationalized it that way. He had the devil beaten out of him and became a very dangerous guy. And he couldn’t handle his liquor, which is one of the worst aspects of him. And he went crazy. Understanding how that happened is useful, I think. There’s no reason any one of us couldn’t be Edgar Watson.”
~ Peter Mathiessen On Writing “Killing Mister Watson”