By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

GOVERNOR QUINN PROCLAIMS AUGUST 19 “MARTIN SHEEN AND EMILIO ESTEVEZ DAY”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CHICAGO – Martin Sheen will go home with more than just the Silver Hugo for Career Achievement when he visits Chicago this August for the Chicago International Film Festival’s Annual Summer Gala.  Governor Quinn has announced that he will honor the legendary actor and his son by proclaiming August 19th, “Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez Day” in the state of Illinois.  The Governor will be on hand at the Gala to make the official proclamation, which will be followed by a special screening of Sheen’s latest film The Way, directed by son, Emilio Estevez.

Illinois’ outstanding creative community is just one of the many reasons the Chicago International Film Festival is a great success year after year,” Governor Quinn said. “In recognition of their many contributions to the arts and other charitable causes, I hereby proclaim Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez Day in Illinois and welcome their continued support of our state’s film industry.”

The Summer Gala honoring Martin Sheen with special guest Emilio Estevez will be held at AMC River East (322 E. Illinois St.) with reception following at The Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers. The evening will feature the Chicago Premiere of The Way, and will be followed by an intimate discussion with the legendary father and son duo.

Vivian Teng, Managing Director of Cinema/Chicago highlights the importance of this fundraiser: “Proceeds from this event supports our year-round Educational Outreach program, a program that brings filmmakers and their films to thousands of inner-city students, including the deaf and hard of hearing, and fosters media literacy. It will also help make possible the 47th Chicago International Film Festival, October 6-20, 2011.”

Cinema/Chicago, the presenter of the Chicago International Film Festival, is a not-for-profit cultural and education organization dedicated to fostering better understanding between cultures and to making a positive contribution to the art form of the moving image.

The Summer Gala is presented by Cinema/Chicago and the Chicago International Film Festival, American Airlines, Lincoln, and Tribeca Flashpoint Media Arts Academy. Evening partners include: Park Hyatt Chicago, Grey Goose, CS, Today’s Chicago Woman, and TimeOut Chicago.

Tickets for the Summer Gala are on sale NOW! For event and ticket information visit:
www.chicagofilmfestival.com.

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DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato