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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Listening to ANOTHER EARTH

A video by Rupert Creswell for the weirdly beautiful “The First Time I Saw Jupiter,” by Brooklyn band Fall On Your Sword, composers of the score to Another Earth. There’s a moment near or at the end of the movie where it kicks in one last time and… lovely.

The financing of low-low-budgeted Another Earth is unusual, reports ace analyst Gregg Goldstein at Variety (paywall) in “Microbudget success boosts nonprofit: Nonprofit shingle turns brings in su[r]prising coin on ‘Earth.'” “Artists Public Domain just scored one of the most profitable sales in the history of Sundance. It’s celebrating a 10-year anniversary. But even if you’re in the film industry, chances are you’ve never heard of this nonprofit producer,” Goldstein introduces. 2008’s Momma’s Man was an earlier production, but it wasn’t the success Another Earth is even before theatrical release. The New York-based nonprofit was paid close to $3 million for Mike Cahill and Brit Marling’s reportedly $150,000 production. Goldstein computes that those figures mean, that despite added costs to make the film ready for delivery to Searchlight, it’s made back ten times its investment. Ah, but here’s the rub: “Under APD’s 501(c)(3) charity rules, none of the filmmakers can profit from it.” “It’s the first time we’ve ever had a film that’s in profit,” co-founder Hunter Gray told Variety. “We’ve never held a fundraiser, we don’t have any employees and we have very little overhead… No one on the board gets paid, and we can never take money out.” Deferred fees can be paid once an APD project makes money, but there are no traditional “points.” Goldstein weighs the intriguing implications (and complications) in the full article at the link.

One Response to “Listening to ANOTHER EARTH”

  1. Mark says:

    Another Earth is the best sci-fi film I have ever seen (and I have seen hundreds)

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“Film festivals, for those who don’t know, are not exactly the glitzy red carpet affairs you see on TV. Those do happen, but they’re a tiny part of the festival. The main part of any film festival are the thousands of people with festival passes hanging on lanyards beneath their anoraks, carrying brochures for movies you have never and will never hear of, desperately scrabbling to sell whatever movie it is to buyers from all over the world. Every hotel bar, every cafe, every restaurant is filled to the brim with these people, talking loudly about non-existent deals. The Brits are the worst because most of the British film industry, with a few honourable exceptions, are scam artists and chancers who move around from company to company failing to get anything good made and trying to cast Danny Dyer in anything that moves. I’m seeing guys here who I first met twenty years ago and who are still wearing the same clothes, doing the same job (albeit for a different company) and spinning the same line of bullshit about how THIS movie has Al Pacino or Meryl Streep or George Clooney attached and, whilst that last one didn’t work out, THIS ONE is going to be HUGE. As the day goes on, they start drinking and it all gets ugly and, well, that’s why I’m the guy walking through the Tiergarten with a camera taking pictures of frozen lakes and pretending this isn’t happening.

“Berlin is cool, though and I’ve been lucky to be doing meetings with some people who want to actually get things done. We’ll see what comes of it.”
~ Julian Simpson 

“The difference between poetry and prose, and why if you’re not acculturated to poetry, you might resist it: that page is frightening. Why is it not filled? The two categories of people who don’t feel that way are children and prisoners. So many prison poets; they see that gap and experience it differently. I’m for the gap!”
~ Poet Eileen Myles