By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

“Digital movie delivery is a deceit,” says Facets Multimedia

Membership in Facets Multi-Media’s DVD rental service has soared by nearly 40% in the past year. Membership affords free rentals from Facets’ library of over 65,000 titles, including art house, classic, foreign, documentary and silent films on DVD, and – for those with the technology to support it – VHS.

“At this moment, the digital delivery of movies is a deceit,” said Milos Stehlik director of Facets. “It’s like 1,000 channels of television, with nothing to watch. For anyone who loves movies, DVD is today still the best option.”

Facets continues to focus on expanding its video library with many import releases and independently produced films on DVD.  These are all available to rent by mail – a service Facets pioneered with VHS in 1983. “The DVD is a fragile and temporal medium, and DVDs go out of print very quickly. Many of the films in the Facets DVD library are rare and now out-of-print,” said Stehlik. Facets also keeps – and continues to collect – films in VHS which never made the transition from VHS to DVD.

“For us, the overriding principle is to make all the great films available and accessible to our members,” said Stehlik. “Our commitment is to preserve the art of film. For now, the DVD format is still the best platform. This may change in the future, but the future isn’t here yet.”

While Facets is committed to collecting and lending films in DVD and VHS formats for as long as the disks or tapes hold out, they are also hard at work on a new and innovative means of online movie delivery. Even then, Facets would continue to preserve those films which are not available for online streaming or download in DVD or VHS – “as long as there are players to play them back.”

The Facets DVD collection includes not only releases from mainstream studios, but from thousands of independent DVD publishers and Facets’ own DVD publishing label. The Facets collection is astonishing and unique for its breadth and depth, with films from the birth of the silent film era to the work of cutting-edge film directors fresh from some of the world’s great film festivals.

Memberships at Facets (which include free shipping of DVDs, no late fees, online rental queue, and recommendations by a knowledgeable staff of film experts) start at $8.99 and range to $23.99 per month. The Chicago-based non-profit organization was founded by Stehlik in 1975.

For further information about Facets movie rental plans and online catalog, visit www.facetsmovies.com or call 1-800-532-2387.

Facets Video | 1517 W. Fullerton Ave. | Chicago, IL 60614 | Facets Multi-Media, founded in 1975, is a non-profit, 501(C)3 organization, and a leading national media arts organization.

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MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé

A Haunted House 2 is not a movie. It is a nervous breakdown. Directed by Michael Tiddes but largely the handiwork of star, producer, and co-writer Marlon Wayans, the film is being billed as yet another Wayans-ized spoof of the horror movie genre, à la the first Haunted House movie and the wildly successful Scary Movie series. (Keenen Ivory Wayans and his brothers were responsible for the first two Scary Movie films; they have since left that franchise, which may explain why a new one was needed.) And there are some familiar digs at recent horror flicks: This time, the creepy doll and the closet from The Conjuring, the family-murdering demon from Sinister, and the dybbuk box from The Possession all make appearances. But this new film is mostly an excuse for star Marlon Wayans to have extended freak-outs in response to the horrors visited upon him—shrieking, screaming, crying, cowering, and occasionally hate-fucking for minutes on end. Yes, you read that last bit right. A Haunted House 2 puts the satyriasis back in satire.”
Ebiri On A Haunted House 2