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By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

First DVD Edition Of Rivette’s epic OUT 1 Out In November

Out 1

Jacques Rivette’s 12-hour-nine-minute Out 1: noli me tangere is coming to DVD in November for a mere 70 euro, with German subtitles from absolut-medien.de. So where’s the English subtitled version! One go among worshipful viewers was not enough. Rivette talked about Out 1 to Bernard Eisenschitz, Jean-Andre Fieschi and Eduardo de Gregorio in April 1973. (Translation: Tom Milne.) This passage seems to speak to this hardly-seen “text.” “A film is always presented in a closed form: a certain number of reels which are screened in a certain order, a beginning, an end. Within this, all these phenomena can occur of circulating meanings, functions and forms; moreover, these phenomena can be incomplete, not finally determined once and for all. This isn’t simply a matter of tinkering, of something mechanical constructed from the outside, but rather… of something that has been ‘generated’ which seems to entail biological factors. It isn’t a matter of making a film or a work that exhausts its coherence, that closes in on itself; it must continue to function, and to create new meanings, directions and feelings.

“Here one comes back to the Barthes definition. I refer to Barthes a good deal, but I find that he speaks more lucidly than anyone else at the present time about this kind of problem… and he says: there is a text from the moment one can say: things are circulating. To me it is evident that this potential in the cinema is allied to the semblance of monumentality we were just talking about. What I mean is that on the screen the film presents a certain number of events, objects, characters in quotes, which are closed in on themselves, turned inward, exactly as a statue can be, presenting themselves without immediately stating an identity, and which simultaneously establish comings-and-goings, echoes, among one another.” Let the echoes begin.

Out 4

5 Responses to “First DVD Edition Of Rivette’s epic OUT 1 Out In November”

  1. Damn, looks like it’s been delayed till next October.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    aw

  3. David says:

    It’s finally out and it does have English subtitles for Noli me tangere. Spectre however doesn’t.

  4. Ray Pride says:

    That is the version, Spassky. Mine arrived 3 days after shipment. Check the Rosenbaum link on front page for information. SPECTRE and the extras don’t have English subs. OUT 1: NMT does.

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
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