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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

The Massive DirecTV Campaign For Home Premiere

There is not a word about the program on the service’s website. And the only indication of its existence you will find on your DirecTV HD-equipped service is the above. $29.99 for Just Go With It… no mention of the early release… nothing special compared to the many other promoted pay-VOD offerings… and right next to the offer of “400 new releases & 6000 shows an movies.”

So you tell me… are the studios or DirecTV seriously expecting anyone to buy something that’s premium priced, but not even being sold?

Oh wait… ““We’re testing a price point and testing a window in the early days of this product, and we’ll see how it takes,” Chang, DirecTV’s head of content strategy and development, said today in an interview. “Down the road, if the window gets tweaked and changed, I think we all cross that bridge when we get to it.” (Blooomberg)

I guess it’s good that someone is pretending that the next step isn’t already planned for 45 days and $20, followed by 30 days and $15 when that fails.

3 Responses to “The Massive DirecTV Campaign For Home Premiere”

  1. Joe Leydon says:

    Actually, I have found that Comcast does next to nothing to alert people that indie movies that haven’t even opened yet in theaters can be viewed as VOD. I’m not comparing, say, Tiny Furniture or Heartless to Just Go With It in terms of audience appeal. But it does seem to me that, across the board, we’re still pretty much in the Jursassic period when it comes to VOD marketing.

  2. Blackcloud says:

    C’mon, Joe, no love for the Ordovician or Permian?

  3. Russell says:

    Yeah, Comcast does nothing to promote its OnDemand service really aside from flaunting the number of shows available by number. For instance, the movie Super with Ellen Page is available on VOD yet there’s no mention of it anywhere and it isn’t the easiest to find either. Is Super also available on DirectTV or is it Comcast-only?

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