MCN Blogs
Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Looks Like a Swell Swell Season

The film I most wish I was seeing at Tribeca right now is Swell Season, which Peter Knegt just wrote up for indieWIRE. The doc follows Once duo Marketa Irglova and Glen Hansard (my super-secret musician boyfriend) during their three-year tour following their Oscar win, in a film that started out to be a doc about musicians who won an Oscar, and ended up capturing the end of Irglova and Hansard’s personal relationship in the whirlwind aftermath of that glory.

I’m hoping (fingers crossed, fingers crossed) that Swell Season will be playing at SIFF next month, and that I’ll be able to write it up from here. Given that SIFF runs for something like 89,000 days, I should be able to squeeze it into my schedule, if it’s on their slate (which is due to be announced May 5, I think).

For now, though, here’s the trailer for Swell Season. A good trailer is about setting up the the story and creating a desire for “more” without being too long or giving away too much. And for me, the trailer for this little film does that just about perfectly.

More, please.

Also, if you’re interested in hearing about the behind-the-scenes action, here’s a video of the post-screening Q&A from Tribeca, from indieWIRE’s Peter Knegt:

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

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~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver