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Kim Voynar

By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

How Many Scott Pilgrims Does It Take to Screw in a Lightbulb?

We’re off to Sakura Con, the Pacific Northwest’s biggest anime con, this weekend. My husband and I will be kept busy-busy schlepping our six kids plus a couple of their friends all over the Washington State Convention Center, going to panels, and admiring all the awesome costumes that blossom over downtown Seattle like cherry blossoms each April.

Friday is always my favorite day of this con, just because downtown is still dense with working professionals who always look a little askance at their yuppie turf being invaded by a bunch of young people (and old people like us, too!) dressed up in an astonishing array of costumes.
We popped downtown yesterday to grab our badges, having learned the hard way last year that if you wait until Friday to do so, you get to wait in line for maybe three hours to pick up the badge you paid for six months ago, because for some reason they won’t just mail out badges like Pax does. So all we have to do is check into our hotel and hit the ground running.

Judging from the percentage of costumes we saw just last night, there’s going to be an awful lot of Scott Pilgrims running around downtown Seattle this weekend. It’s the perfect costume for the slacker guy who doesn’t want to dress up in something “dorky,” but whose girlfriend insists on cosplaying and dragging him with her. Okay, so I’ll be Scott Pilgrim and you be Ramona Flowers, babe. Pretty much win-win for the guy — he gets to toss on jeans and a t-shirt and grab his bass (and who in Seattle doesn’t have a bass lying around?), and walk around with a hot chick in purple leggings and a blue or purple wig all weekend.

I’ll take some pics of the better costumes we see this weekend to post later, so you can see the insanity for yourself. Happy Easter weekend!

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3 Responses to “How Many Scott Pilgrims Does It Take to Screw in a Lightbulb?”

  1. Kim Voynar says:

    Don …. well, yeah. You’ve met me. You know this. :-)

  2. Joe Straatmann says:

    I tried to talk my girlfriend into the Scott Pilgrim thing for a con in November, but she insisted on other costumes and we made a deal that I don’t have to pay for mine as my birthday present and we’ll go with her idea. I’m not really a costume person as I just like watching the stuff, but eh, the things you do for love. I’ll just have to explain the tagged pictures to the normal folk I watch football with. I imagine it’ll go something like, “I’ve posted links to a metal cover band of Studio Ghibli songs. You were expecting me to not be a dork?”

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“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

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~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson